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Wednesday, March 16
 

6:00am PDT

Cornell University Press (Discounts and more!)
Meet Sr. Editor Michael McGandy at the Cornell University Press tables and browse our titles. We're offering a 30% discount on purchases made at the conference and on our website with promo code UAA16, good from March 16 until April 15. Visit our UAA web page or download our PDF book list for more information!

Follow Michael McGandy on Twitter @michaelmcgandy
Follow Cornell Press on Twitter @CornellPress
http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/


Wednesday March 16, 2016 6:00am - 6:15am PDT
Indigo Ballroom A/E

6:00am PDT

Fordham University Press (Discounts and more!)

Fordham University Press, leading publisher of books in the humanities and social sciences, established the regional imprint, Empire State Editions. It seeks to publish creatively interdisciplinary work on topics related to New York City, from the environment to infrastructure to transportation. Stop by our booth to meet Fredric Nachbaur, browse our tiles, and receive a 30% discount on purchases made at the conference.



Wednesday March 16, 2016 6:00am - 6:15am PDT
Indigo Ballroom A/E

6:00am PDT

Routledge (Discounts; Learn how to get published!)
Routledge is a leading publisher of books and journals in the fields of Planning, Housing and Urban Studies. Visit our booth to view our publications, receive a 20% discount on books and find out how to get published or contribute to our books and journal programme.


Wednesday March 16, 2016 6:00am - 6:15am PDT
Indigo Ballroom A/E

6:59am PDT

8:00am PDT

Wednesday - Graduate Student Workshops (Workshop requires separate application and acceptance process.) - SPECIAL BADGE REQUIRED FOR ENTRY
UAA PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
Wednesday, March 16, 2016 | 8:00am – 5:30pm
Locations: Aqua Salon F

Important Dates

  • November 25, 2015 —– Application Deadline! The application deadline has passed. Late applications will not be considered.
  • December 7, 2015 —— Review decisions (Acceptance/Rejection notices will be sent to the email address provided in submitted application form.)
  • January 19, 2016 ——- Workshop directory materials: Bio & photo are due from ALL Workshop Participants
  • January 22, 2016 ——- Conference registration deadline for ALL workshop participants
Workshop Coordinator: Dr. Nicole Ruggiano (Florida International University)

Questions?
Contact us at gradws@uaamail.org

Detailed Schedule

8:00am–10:00am --- Workshop A: The Dissertation Process
Targeted Audience: Doctoral students who are early on in the dissertation process. Topics to be covered include:
  • Nuts and bolts of the dissertation proposal stage
    (i.e. choosing research topic, managing dissertation committee, conducting literature review and writing a synthesis, documents and notes management)
  • Methodology
    (i.e. gaining expertise in qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approach; things to consider in choosing one verses another)
  • Time and life management
    (i.e. time management, stress management, balancing life and research responsibilities)

10:00am–10:15am --- BREAK

10:15am–12:15pm --- Workshop B: Publishing
Journal editors and authors will share extensively on preparing your research for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. Topics that will be covered include
  • Manuscript preparation and submission for peer-reviewed journal
    (e.g. constructing articles out of your dissertation)
  • Understanding other publication opportunities
    Example: online journals, book review, open access journal and other digital media
  • Lessons from an early-career faculty
  • Lessons from an mid-career faculty

12:15pm–1:00pm --- Lunch and Program
Professional Organizations and Conferences:
How to Get the Most Out of Them
(Margaret Wilder, Ph.D., Urban Affairs Association)

1:00pm–4:30pm --- Workshop C: Getting Your First Job

1:00pm-2:00pm --- Part 1. General Job Search Strategies & Issues
Facilitators will discuss job search strategies.

Learn about job search strategies for
  • A faculty position at a liberal arts university
  • A research position at non-academic non-profit institution
  • A faculty at a research academic institution
  • Any type of position
2:00pm–2:15pm --- BREAK

2:15pm–3:30pm --- Part 2. Academic Job Search Intensive: Job Ads, CVs, Job Talks & Interview Process
Workshop facilitator will include faculty members who have participated in and lead successful searches for new junior faculty members at their institutions. Topics to be discussed include
  • Before you go on the job market
  • Process of searching and applying for academic positions
    From the posting to a job announcement, to developing dossier, to the first day of starting your job
  • Basics of a job talk
  • Tips to successfully getting through conference, telephone, and campus interviews


3:30pm–4:30pm --- Part 3. Non-Academic Job Search Intensive from A-Z
Discuss the materials you need to prepare for the job market
  • Before you go on the job market
  • Learn the difference between a CV and resume as well as how to transform one into the other
  • Receive tips on tailoring your cover letters to make sure that you clearly communicate how your skills, experiences, and research area are a good fit for potential employers
  • Interviewing and following-up

4:30pm-5:30pm --- Networking Hour
Enjoy a drink while networking with colleagues. Start working on the job search and building your professional peer network now!


Wednesday March 16, 2016 8:00am - 5:30pm PDT
Aqua Salon F

9:30am PDT

11:30am PDT

1:00pm PDT

Tour 1: Affordable and Supportive Housing in San Diego
Tour 1: Affordable and Supportive Housing in San Diego

Tour Date:
Wednesday, March 16, 2016
Tour Time: 1:00pm - 4:00pm
% of Time Walking: 20%
% of Time on Bus: 80%
Cost (USD): $30.00
Maximum Number of Participants: 50

>>>REGISTER ONLINE!<<<

Departure Location:
Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel Lobby
Departure Meeting Time:
12:45pm
Departure Time:
1:00pm
Tour Leader: Deborah Ruane, Senior Vice President, Real Estate Division (San Diego Housing Commission)

Tour Description:
The tour will explore affordable new construction, historic rehabilitation, single room occupancy hotels, high-rise affordable construction, permanent supportive housing, and homeless facilities. A discussion and visit to the San Diego Housing Commission Achievement Academy will also be provided.

The tour will cover San Diego real estate challenges, public policy and community issues, innovations in funding, unique construction and design elements, and the current housing crisis which, if left unchecked, will have significant negative implications on industry and San Diego’s continued and future economic well-being.

Tour Tips/Suggestions: Wear comfortable shoes and bring bottled water

Wednesday March 16, 2016 1:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Meet in hotel lobby at 12:45p
  Tours

1:00pm PDT

Wednesday - Exploring Activist Scholarship: Examples, Methods and Lessons Learned (Workshop requires separate application and acceptance process.) - SPECIAL BADGE REQUIRED FOR ENTRY
UAA ACTIVIST SCHOLAR WORKSHOP
Wednesday, March 16, 2016 | 1:00PM – 5:30PM
Location: Aqua Salon A/B

IMPORTANT DATES
  • November 25, 2015 —– Application Deadline! The application deadline has passed. Late applications will not be considered.
  • December 7, 2015 —— Review decisions (Acceptance/Rejection notices will be sent to the email address   provided in submitted application form.) 
  • January 22, 2016 ——- Conference registration deadline for ALL workshop participants

QUESTIONS?
Contact us at activistws@uaamail.org

GOAL & OBJECTIVES

Broad Goal:
Contribute to policy and programmatic outcomes that are socially, politically, and economically just and sustainable for urban communities

Broad Objectives
  • Promote direct application of academic research and service to initiatives aimed at just outcomes
  • Provide a cross-issue, multi-disciplinary space for critical analysis of activist scholarship through the examination of methods/strategies employed to address unjust urban issues/policies
  • Support personal and career development of academics engaged in such initiatives
  • Increase the awareness and elevate the importance of these initiatives within academic and institutional contexts
  • Create resources and knowledge-sharing opportunities

PURPOSES OF WORKSHOP
  • Explore activist research methodology
  • Provide a supportive space for activist-oriented scholars
  • Build networking community to share ideas and lessons learned
  • Keep others informed about organizing efforts and happenings around the country
  • Explore real problems and issues in urban communities, as experienced and witnessed by the engaged activist
(Accepted participants, who have registered for the UAA conference, must report to the UAA Conference Registration Office (Indigo Ballroom E/F) to pick-up name badges to be admitted into workshop.)

STRUCTURE OF THE WORKSHOP

1:00PM – 1:30PM        Introduction of Facilitators and Participants
1:30PM – 3:00PM        Activist Research Methods
1:30PM – 2:15PM        What is activist scholarship? (Presentations)
2:15PM - 3:00PM        Examples of Activist Research Methods ( Roundtable Discussion)
3:00PM – 3:15PM        Coffee Break

3:15PM – 4:30PM        The Personal and Professional Aspects of Scholar-Activism
4:30PM – 4:45PM        Special Announcement – Publishing Opportunities
4:45PM – 5:30PM        Networking Opportunity

Sponsors

Wednesday March 16, 2016 1:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Aqua Salon A/B

4:00pm PDT

4:30pm PDT

6:30pm PDT

 
Thursday, March 17
 

6:00am PDT

Cornell University Press (Discounts and more!)
Meet Sr. Editor Michael McGandy at the Cornell University Press tables and browse our titles. We're offering a 30% discount on purchases made at the conference and on our website with promo code UAA16, good until April 15. Visit our UAA web page or download our PDF book list for more information!

Follow Michael McGandy on Twitter @michaelmcgandy
Follow Cornell Press on Twitter @CornellPress
http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/


Thursday March 17, 2016 6:00am - 6:15am PDT
Indigo Ballroom A/E

6:00am PDT

Fordham University Press (Discounts and more!)

Fordham University Press, leading publisher of books in the humanities and social sciences, established the regional imprint, Empire State Editions. It seeks to publish creatively interdisciplinary work on topics related to New York City, from the environment to infrastructure to transportation. Stop by our booth to meet Fredric Nachbaur, browse our tiles, and receive a 30% discount on purchases made at the conference.



Thursday March 17, 2016 6:00am - 6:15am PDT
Indigo Ballroom A/E

6:00am PDT

Routledge (Discounts; Learn how to get published!)
Routledge is a leading publisher of books and journals in the fields of Planning, Housing and Urban Studies. Visit our booth to view our publications, receive a 20% discount on books and find out how to get published or contribute to our books and journal programme.


Thursday March 17, 2016 6:00am - 6:15am PDT
Indigo Ballroom A/E

6:59am PDT

6:59am PDT

Thursday - Book Exhibit
Exhibitors
AB

Association Book Exhibit (Debmark Bks., Inc.)

 A combined display of scholarly/professional titles from leading publishers. Free ordering catalog available at the booth.
avatar for Helen Bader Institute for Nonprofit Management

Helen Bader Institute for Nonprofit Management

Through pioneering educational programs, applied research, and active engagement with nonprofit organizations of all types and sizes, the Helen Bader Institute for Nonprofit Management (HBI) develops nonprofit leaders who change lives. HBI’s programs offer a healthy balance of theory... Read More →

Exhibitor Attendees
avatar for Fiona Counsell

Fiona Counsell

Managing Editor, Routledge | Taylor & Francis
Looking forward to UAA 2016! Delegates are most welcome to talk to me about publishing, particularly journal publishing. Happy to discuss getting published, the journal process, marketing your research and yourself, social media, digital media, Open Access and more.
avatar for Douglas Hildebrand

Douglas Hildebrand

Director & Publisher, University of Alberta Press
avatar for Michael McGandy

Michael McGandy

Senior Editor, Cornell University Press
Michael McGandy acquires books in urban history with a focus on New York City and New York State. Follow Michael on Twitter @michaelmcgandy
avatar for Fredric Nachbaur

Fredric Nachbaur

Director, Fordham University Press
As publisher of the Polis: Fordham Series in Urban Studies, I am searching for authors in fields as diverse as American Studies, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Urban Studies and who can write for both academic and informed lay audiences. Our objective is... Read More →
avatar for Juliana Pitanguy

Juliana Pitanguy

Springer Publishing
My name is Juliana Pitanguy and I am Associate Editor at Springer in the Netherlands. I develop the urban studies and urban geography program, inviting interest in publications and encouraging participation.
NS

Nicole Solano

Senior Editor, Routledge | Taylor & Francis
I'm the senior editor for the planning and urban design list at Routledge. In particular, I'm looking for book projects that focus on issues of social justice and equity, affordable housing, service learning in planning and urban design, and cutting-edge research. I would welcome... Read More →
avatar for Kay Tancock

Kay Tancock

Publisher - Geography, Planning & Development, Elsevier Ltd.
Kay Tancock is a Publisher of Geography, Planning and Development journals at Elsevier in Oxford, UK. She manages a portfolio of 20 academic journals in this disciplinary field. Kay will be running a stand in the exhibitors' area, providing information on many aspects of publishing... Read More →


Thursday March 17, 2016 6:59am - 6:00pm PDT
Indigo Ballroom E/F

6:59am PDT

7:00am PDT

7:15am PDT

TH7.15.03 Urban Green Spaces, Public Health, and Sustainability Across the United States
Urbanization presents some of our greatest environmental opportunities and challenges. Changes to the urban landscape can redefine the spaces that support and undermine the natural environment. Urban green spaces (e.g. parks, gardens, and other vegetated areas) can deliver several benefits to urban areas. These benefits, often described as ecosystem services, may promote physical activity, enhance a sense of place, improve psychological health, and mitigate the urban heat island effect. Research articulates how socioeconomic gaps and inequitable access to urban green spaces relate to issues in environmental justice. This predicament also has implications on urban health and sustainability that should be further explored. During this roundtable, we feature multiple case studies across the United States to highlight linkages between urban green spaces and the following: 1.) health disparities (e.g. obesity, heat-related illness, and psychological well-being) across demographic groups, 2.) social determinants of health (e.g. neighborhood environment, education, and economic stability) outlined in Healthy People 2020, 3.) and other issues related to urban sustainability. Participants will engage in an interactive discussion on interdisciplinary approaches to regard the natural environment, public health, and other urban affairs.

Speakers
VJ

Viniece Jennings

Biological Scientist, USDA Forest Service
LL

Lincoln Larson

Clemson University, Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management


Thursday March 17, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

TH7.15.05 Change the City Without Taking Power (or Really Changing)? A Discussion on Questions of Localism and Regionalism
The hyper-local scales of “corridors,” neighborhoods, and even yards have become central loci of nominally progressive urban politics. Fueled, in part, by the in-migration of younger residents with access to certain forms of capital and social networks, some areas of the city become the focus of intense reinvestment in “quality of life” issues like bicycle infrastructure and green space. But the region as a whole rarely benefits. Given the legacy of regional planning as a tool that fueled segregation, displacement, and uneven development, many progressive activists, planners, and long-term urban residents are suspicious of large-scale policies. At the same time, recalcitrant homeowners and businesses in wealthy areas still very much embrace a post-1960s fear of programs that might redistribute wealth and opportunity away from their communities across a region. For example, in the San Francisco Bay Area, a new regional jobs, housing, and transportation plan draws ire from left (as gentrification) and right (as “social engineering”). At last year's UAA meeting, we ended our papers with a provocation—what would a regional politics of place look like? Given the above realities, have new forms of progressive politics emerged that can address socio-economic and ecological problems at the regional scale? Is it possible to move from enthusiasm for localist “urbanism” toward alliances across race, class, and place lines to build something like regional equity? Do these politics multiply to remake entire regions? Or are they, as we fear, furthering the uneven spatial distribution of resources and amenities in urban areas? We invite participants to discuss the implications of the above for a regional politics of place, and what alternative regionally-minded progressive politics might already exist. We are particularly interested in city-suburb alliances, land trusts and other decommodification schemes, and new translocal political groupings, but welcome discussion of all ideas and interventions.

Speakers
avatar for John Stehlin

John Stehlin

University of California, Berkeley
avatar for Alex Tarr

Alex Tarr

Andrew W Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Spatial Humanities, Rice University


Thursday March 17, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

TH7.15.06 Career and Knowledge Pathways in an Urban Setting
Much has been discussed in the public press about skills mismatch, job mismatch, and career pathways but we lack understanding of the nuances and implications to the university system. This roundtable offers an opportunity to discuss career guidance strategies used by universities in urban settings to prepare their students for the job market. The discussion leader has studied one set of strategies used at Cleveland State University (CSU), an urban university in Cleveland, Ohio.

Speakers

Thursday March 17, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

TH7.15.07 The Myth of Self-Sufficiency
Historically, U.S. housing policy objectives were to provide “a decent home and a suitable living environment for every American family.” Beginning in the 1980s, however, these goals were broadened to include the promotion of “self-sufficiency” among public housing residents. Since then, the term “self-sufficiency” has slipped into the titles and objective statements of contemporary housing programs without a clear understanding of (i) what it really means, (ii) the impact of individual versus structural barriers to becoming self-sufficient, and (iii) whether it is a reasonable expectation for many public housing residents. This breakfast roundtable seeks to bring together academics and policy makers from across housing, social work, and workforce development to explore these questions.

Speakers

Thursday March 17, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

TH7.15.08 UAA Institutional Members Roundtable
Representatives of UAA Institutional Members are welcome to join UAA Membership Committee Chair, Heywood Sanders, for an open discussion about their interests, concerns, and how UAA might extend its support to address these matters.

Speakers

Thursday March 17, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

TH7.15.01 Applying for Grants: Perspectives From Seasoned Professors
The roundtable will focus on tips and strategies for writing successful grants. The discussion will be led by seasoned professors who have gotten grants.

Speakers
RC

Roger Caves

San Diego State University
DP

David Perry

University of Illinois at Chicago
FW

Fritz Wagner

University of Washington


Thursday March 17, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

TH7.15.02 Twenty-First Century American Cities: Publishing Your City
The authors of Twenty-First Century Chicago, published by Cognella in 2010, 2012, 2015 are recruiting editors to collaborate on a new series of books: Twenty-First Century American Cities. This roundtable is designed for urban scholars who are interested in replicating, adopting, adapting, and expanding the model used in Twenty-First Century Chicago, to their city. During this roundtable, series editors will detail the publishing model and explain how other scholars can address the major social, economic, political and governmental challenges facing their city and metropolitan region, in an era of globalization.

Speakers
CM

Constance Mixon

Director of Urban Studies; Associate Professor of Political Science, Elmhurst College
MM

Melissa Mouritsen

College of DuPage


Thursday March 17, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

TH7.15.04 The Promise and Pitfalls of Teaching Field Work
Field work is central to many urbanists. The ability to see important social processes in action in the "urban laboratory" informs much of our research and our pedagogy. Through leaving the classroom students are able to see that classroom knowledge matters in the "real world." Additionally, we are able to encourage students to take more risks, create new knowledge, and own their education more fully in the field. However, this risk-taking also involves heightened vulnerability. Other occupants of our "urban laboratories" do not always respond well to our presence; students may make questionable choices in the field; our best-laid plans may falter outside the classroom. This roundtable invites us to wrestle with our experiences of field work as an important element of pedagogy, and strategies for working through the mis-steps and missed opportunities that arise when teaching in our communities. What makes some field work experiences successful for students? Importantly, what can make field work experiences problematic for our students, for ourselves and for the communities we engage with? When faced with field work gone awry, how do we learn from mistakes, and help students learn from them as well?

Speakers
avatar for Leslie Martin

Leslie Martin

University of Mary Washington


Thursday March 17, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

8:05am PDT

TH8.05.00 General Plenary--Social Justice Challenges and Opportunities in a Bi-National Region: San Diego in Context
Speakers
NC

Nico Calavita

San Diego State University
2016 Activist Scholar Awardee; Professor Emeritus, San Diego State University
RJ

Reginald Jones

President & CEO--Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation
SL

Susan Lea Riggs

Acting Director, California State Department of Housing and Community Development

Moderators
RC

Roger Caves

San Diego State University

Thursday March 17, 2016 8:05am - 9:05am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

8:05am PDT

Thursday - Plenary Session
Thursday March 17, 2016 8:05am - 9:05am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

9:14am PDT

Thursday - Concurrent Sessions
Thursday March 17, 2016 9:14am - 10:40am PDT
See session listing
  Panels

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.05 Promise of Urban Fellowships for Building Capacity in Distressed Communities—Place Based Policy Lessons From the Field
Urban fellowship programs have been around for decades starting with initial investments from the Ford Foundation in the 1960s, but the academic literature says very little about how fellowship can serve as agents of local policy change or help build community capacity. Based on a 2015 assessment of the Strong Cities, Strong Communities (SC2) Fellowship program (2012-2015), this roundtable will explore the “promise of urban fellowships” as a critical component of federal placed-based urban policy to enhance and expand the capacity of local governments and community based organizations in distressed communities. To frame the discussion SC2 fellowship management and evaluation team members will share the results from their program evaluation and position it within the expanding academic and practitioner interest in federal place based urban policy. They will also feature their extensive research about the emerging field of urban fellowship—a typology of fellowship programs—informed by a November 2014 symposium convened at the Urban Institute that brought together program directors and fellows from other leading fellowship programs (e.g., Detroit Revitalizations Fellows, Washington DC’s Capital Cities Fellows, and CUREx) together with the SC2 fellows. Important questions surfaced during the symposium will help inform the colloquy’s discussion: 1) How do urban fellowship programs define success? 2) What is the structure and process for selecting, placing, and managing the fellows? 3) How do fellows develop support networks and how do local networks support the fellows: 4) How to measure and evaluating the impact and influence of urban fellows? and 5) How to scale and sustain urban fellowship programs over time?

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Bulka

Lauren Bulka

Strategic Initiative Coordinator, Virginia Tech - National Capital Region
GD

Graig Donnelly

Director, Detroit Revitalization Fellows, Wayne State University
KH

Kathryn Hexter

Cleveland State University
avatar for Gretchen Moore

Gretchen Moore

Executive Director, Downtown Fresno Foundation
I have nearly two decades of diverse experience specializing in community engagement, commercial revitalization, non-profit management and coalition-building. The Downtown Fresno Foundation is dedicated to building a vibrant downtown through placemaking, talent retention/attraction... Read More →
WW

Walter Wright

Program Manager for Economic Inclusion, Cleveland State University

Moderators
KH

Kathryn Hexter

Cleveland State University

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Indigo 204B

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.17 Organizing Community Development:“Expertise” & Power in Participatory Research (ACTIVIST SCHOLARSHIP)
This colloquy will engage in critical dialogues on how researchers engage in and train for participatory research focused on issues of community development and what the impacts are for the researchers and the communities involved. What insights do participatory approaches highlight in the current landscape of community organizing and development? What practices emerge for junior scholars and training programs on community-based work? How does such work ultimately impact the communities themselves, and how do academics navigate these tensions? In this colloquy sponsored by both UAA and URBAN, panelists will highlight innovative methodologies and approaches and emerging insights and lessons. Engaging in reflexivity on their respective projects, panelists will discuss their experiences in the context of specific research projects on gentrification and the financialization of real estate, community development, and housing, and encourage discussion with those in the audience. Through the colloquy, we will unpack “activist” scholarship by deliberating how we might address conflicting goals and interests in the communities we work with. Rachel Brahinsky and Leigh Graham will reflect on their experiences directing, teaching and mentoring in graduate programs that prioritize community-engaged research, especially regarding tensions on how to structure programs and design research that serve community needs amidst academic constraints, and regarding conflicting logics and pressures on community engagement within the academy. Emily Rosenman will focus her remarks on the professionalization of mainstream community development networks, the resulting kinds of research most sanctioned and funded by these networks, and how scholars might better engage the sorts of more “activist” stakeholders and research sidelined by such networks. Ben Teresa will discuss how community organizations in New York City use innovative research methods that in the process of producing new knowledge also counter hegemonic real estate investment narratives and practices, and how researchers, policy makers, and other activists engage with these research tools.

Speakers
LG

Leigh Graham, John Jay College, CUNY

John Jay College of Criminal Justice
avatar for Rachel Brahinsky, University of San Francisco

Rachel Brahinsky, University of San Francisco

Assistant Professor, Urban Affairs, University of San Francisco
ER

Emily Rosenman

University of British Columbia
BT

Benjamin Teresa

The Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Moderators
BT

Benjamin Teresa

The Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua Salon E

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.01 Rural Migrants in Transitional Urban China: Marginality, Agency and Social Justice (I)
Rural migrants in transitional urban China have received extensive scholarly attention from all social sciences disciplines. While the large corpus of studies on this peculiar social group have unraveled in depth their unequal access to citizenship, relatively less effort has been made to examine theoretically the uneven structure of power in which rural migrants are located. Yet, this structure of uneven power specifies an identity category that feeds into a variety of exploitative relations, not simply in the domain of economy, but in all aspects of the lifeworld. As Fulong Wu (2010) trenchantly argues, the curtailing of migrant welfare and the sequestration of this social group to a “state of exception” serves the state to preserve China’s competitiveness in a global market. Also, as the three proposed panels attempt to cast some light, the state manipulates and appropriates differentiated citizenship to advance various ends of governance. As such, the cohort of authors assembled here avoid reading migrants’ marginality simply from an institutional perspective, but rather hope to examine the material socio-spatial processes in which marginality unfolds, evolves and constitutes social relations. In other words, we gauge the implications for social justice from the entry point of everyday life and mundane social, economic and cultural transactions. This approach thus enables scholars to attend to migrants’ agency to respond to and negotiate institutional infrastructure, by adopting a more interactive approach towards migrants’ lived experiences and their relation to the state. This one is the first of three successive panels we would like to propose. This first panel focuses on contemplating the structural marginality and the various forms of exclusion and domination to which rural migrants are subject.


Making the Migrant Worker in the Museum: The Emergence of Migrant Worker Museums in Chinese Cities and the Expediency of Discursive Governance
Junxi Qian, Singapore Management University; Jun Wan'guo Guo, South China Normal University

How to Become Homeowners: The Determinants of Rural Migrants’ Tenure Choices in Urban China
Shuangshuang Tang, Nanjing University; Jianxi Feng, Nanjing University

Understanding the Mechanisms Behind the Displacement Pattern of Migrants in Shenzhen: A Perspective From Economic Integration
Ying Liu, Utrecht University

Speakers
YL

Ying Liu

Utrecht University
JQ

Junxi Qian

Singapore Management University
ST

Shuangshuang Tang

Nanjing University

Sponsors
Moderators
JQ

Junxi Qian

Singapore Management University

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Indigo 202A

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.02 Designing Public Policies in East Asia


“Secure Housing” at a Crossroads: Can Thailand’s Baan Mankong Program Be Scaled Up?
Hayden Shelby, University of California, Berkeley

The Living Environment and Welfare Policy for the Elderly
Shigeharu Nomura, Osaka University; Masaki Takayama, Osaka University

Equity in Redistribution to the Elderly and Children: An Intergenerational Conflict in Hong Kong?
Alfred M. Wu, The Hong Kong Institute of Education



Speakers
HS

Hayden Shelby, University of California, Berkeley

University of California, Berkeley
avatar for Alfred M. Wu

Alfred M. Wu

The Hong Kong Institute of Education

Sponsors
Moderators
avatar for Alfred M. Wu

Alfred M. Wu

The Hong Kong Institute of Education

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Indigo 202B

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.04 Affordable Housing and Housing Affordability
Over the past decades, affordable housing and housing affordability has deteriorated for many low-, very low-, and extremely low-income renters and also for some low-income homeowners. Recently, the rental affordability crisis was called a “silent crisis” by Shaun Donovan, former Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). At the same time the number of public or social housing units has decreased while billions are needed to address deferred maintenance. This panel discusses issues pertaining to affordable housing and housing affordability, along with current and future public policies.

The Allocation of Rental Assistance Resources: The Paradox of High Housing Cost and High Vacancy Rates
Kirk McClure, The University of Kansas

Do Tenant- and Place-Based Rental Housing Programs Complement Each Other? Evidence From Ohio
Brett Barkley, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland; Amy Higgins, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston; Francisca Garcia-Cobian Richter, Case Western Reserve University

Waiting for Housing Assistance: Characteristics and Narrative Accounts of Low-Income Older Persons
Jacklyn Kohon, Portland State University; Paula Carder, Portland State University; Aubrey Limburg, Portland State University; Emily Becker, Portland State University

Relaxing Building Regulations to Increase Supply of Affordable Housing: A Case Study From Ahmedabad, India
Sweta Byahut, Auburn University; Bimal Patel, CEPT University; Brijesh Bhatta, Groundwork Architecture

Speakers
avatar for Brett Barkley

Brett Barkley

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland
avatar for Sweta Byahut

Sweta Byahut

Assistant Professor, Auburn University
avatar for Kirk McClure, University of Kansas

Kirk McClure, University of Kansas

Professor, University of Kansas
McClure teaches and conducts research in the area of housing market behavior and affordable housing policy.
avatar for Jacklyn Kohon

Jacklyn Kohon

Portland State University
My interests generally fall into the intersection between urban planning and public health. More specifically: Housing: Affordable housing with services, subsidized housing for low-income older adults, intergenerational housing Sustainability: social sustainability, climate justice... Read More →

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Indigo 204A

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.06 Ongoing Effects of Foreclosure and the Housing Crisis


The Effect of Foreclosure Clusters on Mortgage Lending Decisions
Daniel Hammel, University of Toledo

Costs of the American Dream? Asian Americans, High-Performing Schools, and Foreclosures
C. Aujean Lee, University of California, Los Angeles

Race and Uneven Recovery: Neighborhood Home Value Trajectories in Atlanta Before and After the Housing Crisis
Elora Raymond, Georgia Institute of Technology; Kyungsoon Wang, Georgia Institute of Technology; Dan Immergluck, Georgia Institute of Technology



Speakers
CA

C. Aujean Lee, University of California, Los Angeles

PhD Candidate, University of California, Los Angeles
ER

Elora Raymond

PhD Student, Georgia Institute of Technology

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Indigo 206

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.07 Stakeholders at the Table: Decision-making and Local Development


Nonprofit Advocacy in the Community and Economic Development Sector: Considerations of Role and Function
Colleen Casey, University of Texas at Arlington

Does Public Housing Have A History? A Case Study of Historic Preservation Attempts in Alexandria, Virginia
Adam R. Justus, George Mason University; Katrin B. Anacker, George Mason University

Strong Network, Weak Outcomes? A Case Study of Affordable Housing Providers in Polk County, Iowa
Jane Rongerude, Iowa State University

Addressing Local Housing and Neighborhood Issues: Who is at the Table?
Kim Skobba, University of Georgia; Karen Tinsley, University of Georgia; Ebunoluwa Odeyemi, University of Georgia; Jerry Shannon, University of Georgia

Speakers
avatar for Colleen Casey

Colleen Casey

Associate Professor, University of Texas- Arlington
Dr. Casey received a Ph.D. in Public Policy Analysis with an emphasis in Urban and Community Development from Saint Louis University. In addition to UTA, Dr. Casey has taught at Saint Louis University and the University of Connecticut. She began teaching at UTA in August 2008. Her... Read More →
AR

Adam R. Justus

George Mason University
avatar for Jane Rongerude

Jane Rongerude

Assistant Professor, Iowa State University

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua Salon D

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.08 Contested Terrains of an Immigrant Metropolis
This panel examines the contested terrains of urban development and change, immigrant labor markets, and community identities in Queens, New York - the most racially and ethnically diverse county in the United States.

From Bloomberg's New York to East Asian Finance: Globalization, Immigration, and Gentrification in Queens
James DeFilippis, Rutgers University; Ben Teresa, CUNY

Jackson Heights: Will the Cosmopolis Survive?
Arianna Martinez, LaGuardia CC

Gendered Labor Markets within Ethnic Economies: Asian Immigrant Women Working in Sexually Oriented Massage Parlors in New York City
John Chin, Hunter College CUNY; Lois M. Takahashi, UCLA; Douglas J. Wiebe, University of Pennsylvania; Caitlin Ho, Hunter College CUNY

Speakers
JC

John Chin

Hunter College CUNY
JD

James DeFilippis

Rutgers University
AM

Arianna Martinez

LaGuardia CC

Moderators
JD

James DeFilippis

Rutgers University

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua 314

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.10 Health and Community Development: Rethinking Anchor Investments and Institutions
Increasingly, the health sector is recognizing that community development is an essential ingredient for local action on the social determinants of health. This panel convenes experts from medicine, community development, finance, and public health to consider opportunities for increasing collective impact at the intersections of health and development in the post- Affordable Care Act context of health system transformation. The presentations collectively support rethinking the drivers of this type of intersectoral activity, how the history of the Community Reinvestment Act and its affects in low-income neighborhoods can offer lessons for the navigating the current context, institutional transparency, and strategies for investing to advance health and social equity. Specific subtopics addressed include: addressing the complexity of simultaneously acting on multiple determinants of health, metrics and measures of success, evidence-based community building, fiscal mechanisms to capture and reinvest health care savings, and workforce considerations.


Moderator: Shauneequa Owusu, New York Academy of Medicine

CRA Modernization and Community Benefit: Insights on Investing for Health Impact

John Moon, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

Promoting Co-Location and Collaboration to Address Place-Based Determinants of Health
Amy Gillman, Local Initiatives Support Coalition

Neighborhood Adversity, Child Health, and the Role for Community Development
Douglas Jutte, Building Healthy Places Network and UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program, University of California; Jennifer Miller, Building Healthy Places Network; David Erickson, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

New York State Hospital “Community Building” Investments: Will They Advance Health Equity?
Kimberly Libman, The New York Academy of Medicine

Lessons on Leadership and Sustainability for Building Healthy Neighborhoods
Cherise Fong, East Bay Asian Local Development Corporation

Speakers
CF

Charise Fong

Chief Operation Officer, East Bay Asian Local Development Corporation
AG

Amy Gillman

Local Initiatives Support Coalition
avatar for Douglas Jutte

Douglas Jutte

Executive Director, Building Healthy Places Network and UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program, University of California
Douglas Jutte, MD, MPH is Executive Director of the Build Healthy Places Network, a national organization that catalyzes and supports collaboration across the community development and health sectors. Dr. Jutte has been a leader in the Federal Reserve Bank and RWJ Foundation's Healthy... Read More →
KL

Kimberly Libman

The New York Academy of Medicine
JM

John Moon

Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua 305

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.11 Financing the City and (Re)Development


Variations in Property Taxes Over Vertically Stacked Jurisdictions: Implications for Fiscal Health and Economic Development
Spencer Brien, Naval Posgraduate School; David Swindell, Arizona State University

The Politics of Tax Increment Financing: Evidence from Chicago
Amy Schoenecker, University of Illinois at Chicago

Fines, Forfeitures and Fund Balances: Are California Cities Using Them to Bolster Their Revenue?
Samuel Stone, California State University, Fullerton; Charlotte Kirschner, Ohio State University; James Comeaux, Ohio State University; Akheil Singla, Arizona State University



Speakers
avatar for Spencer Brien

Spencer Brien

Assistant Professor, Naval Posgraduate School
SS

Samuel Stone, California State University, Fullerton

California State University, Fullerton
AS

Amy Schoenecker

University of Illinois at Chicago

Moderators
SS

Samuel Stone, California State University, Fullerton

California State University, Fullerton

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua 313

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.12 Sports and Urban Redevelopment: What Choices Do Cities Have?


Please Sir I Want Some More: An Application of Public Choice Theory to a Community's Investment in Professional Sports
Stephanie Gerretsen, University of Michigan; Mark Rosentraub, University of Michigan

Authorities, Sport Venues, and Real Estate Development
Mark Rosentraub, University of Michigan; Michael Cantor, Sterling Project Development

Stadium Centered Redevelopment in Minor League Cities
Eric Joseph Van Holm, Georgia State University and Georgia Institute of Technology

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Gerretsen

Stephanie Gerretsen

Doctoral Student, University of Michigan
avatar for Eric Joseph van Holm

Eric Joseph van Holm

Georgia State University and Georgia Institute of Technology

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua 310B

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.13 TOD in a Comparative Perspective : New Insights on Processes of Coordination Between Transportation and Urban Planning at the Local Level
The panel focuses on modalities of concrete implementation of strategies aimed at coordinating urban planning and transportation planning. Actually, these strategies are planned across Canadian cities. In many metropolitan areas, this intersectorial coordination objective is usually developed into operational Transit Oriented Development (TOD) projects at the local level. These projects offer the formalization of comprehensive living environments (mixed and dense neigoboorhoods) implemented at the strategic nodes of public transport networks. The aim is to provide a simultaneous response to both metropolitan as well as local issues. At the metropolitan level, these TOD projects would present an alternative to urban sprawl and to car dependency. At the local level, they would be defined as a strategy of redevelopment and revitalization of living environments; a strategy proposing new affordable and liveable neighbourhoods. But in this context, the panel examines, not so much the contents of TODs and their effects on mobility or accessibility, but rather the transport-urbanism processes of coordination in such oprationnal projects. Beyond the specifics of metropolitan governance and planning of each Canadian citiy, the "urbanism – transport” strategy is defined as a local coordination process. It depends, above all, on a specific actors' game, at the various stages of the projects that are planned. Our goal is to provide new knowledges on the modalities of cooperation among actors at different stages of projects TOD type and, on the effects of this cooperation on the content of the urbanism - transport coordination. In the end, the panel constitutes a good chance for proposing a renewed theoretical approach for the process analysis of TODs, as well as analyzing different processes that, at the same token, underlie these projects in various local contexts in Canada and examine the links between these processes and the content of the projects.

For a New Theorical Framework About Transportation and Urban Planning Coordination: TOD as an Instrument of Public Policy
Florence Paulhiac, University of Quebec in Montreal; Mario Gauthier, University of Quebec in Outaouais

From Metropolitan Planning Ideas to Local Realities: Challenges to Implementing Transit-Oriented Development in Montreal Suburban Areas
Juliette Maulat, University of Montreal; Franck Scherrer, University of Montreal

Suburban Multi-Functional Centres: Their Potential for Metropolitan Structure Change and the Obstacles to their Implementation
Pierre Filion, University of Waterloo; Sara Saboonian, University of Waterloo

Vancouver, BC. Canada: Where Transportation Planning Dominates Urban Planning
Emmanuel Brunet Jailly, University of Victoria

Speakers
EB

Emmanuel Brunet Jailly

University of Victoria
JM

Juliette Maulat

University on Montreal

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua 311A

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.14 Analyzing Traveling Data in Global Times


Measuring Urban Form in Travel Behavior Research: Evidence From the 2009 NHTS
Harya Dillon, University of California, Irvine; Jean-Daniel Saphores, University of California, Irvine

Transportation Data and Poor and Minority Populations: How Reliable are the Data?
Steven Howland, Portland State University

Governing Garbage: How Can Local Government Advance Environmental Aims in Sectors Where Service is Privately Delivered?
Jacqueline Peterson, University of Toronto; Sara Hughes, University of Toronto

Speakers
HD

Harya Dillon

Department of Planning, Policy & Design, University of California, Irvine
SH

Steven Howland

Portland State University

Moderators
NR

Nicole Ruggiano

Florida International University

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua 311B

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.15 In the Wake of Disaster: Crises and Urban Governance in Comparative Perspective
This panel brings together empirically- and theoretically-grounded papers that put urban governance challenges at the center of inquiries into social and ecological disasters. With the increasing frequency and severity of disasters, many cities around the world are coping with, recovering from, or preparing for the next crisis. As a result, government officials at all levels, alongside community groups and social service agencies, are faced with numerous and often unknowable challenges. In the immediate aftermath of disasters, such challenges may include efforts to deliver basic supplies to affected communities; while in the longer term, they may entail rebuilding homes, schools, and roads and mending social rifts; and in still longer horizons they could include relocating entire neighborhoods. These efforts are often exacerbated or hindered by governance challenges, including inflexible institutional structures, social conflicts, socio-political boundaries, and seemingly insurmountable distances (both metaphorical and, in some cases, spatial) between states and citizens, scales of governance, diverse communities, and administrative agents. Meanwhile, in exposing conflicts, disconnection, and/or weakness in social systems and governance structures, disasters create room for the emergence of new actors and new ways that historical socio-political boundaries may be crossed. By presenting a diverse set of governance challenges associated with urban social and ecological disasters from rich and poor countries in the global north and the global south, this panel enables an exploration of the emerging demand for reconfiguring comparative urban studies across regional divides. While whole new areas of study have turned their attention to questions of urban resilience, relatively little attention has been paid in this literature to questions of comparative political economy and socio-cultural context. The comparative studies that have been done have tended to stay within a narrow band of “like cases” and, as a consequence, have reproduced familiar tropes about success and failure. This panel questions that approach.

The Social Infrastructure of Resilience in New York City
James Connolly, Northeastern University

The Political Economy of Flooding in Asian Megacities
Gavin Shatkin, Northeastern University

The Political Economy of Shrinking Suburbs
Thomas J. Vicino, Northeastern University; Andrea Sarzynski, University of Delaware

Informality Submerged: Struggles for Housing and Home in Flood-Prone Mumbai
Liza Weinstein, Northeastern University

Speakers
JC

James Connolly

Northeastern University
GS

Gavin Shatkin

Northeastern University
avatar for Thomas Vicino, Northeastern University

Thomas Vicino, Northeastern University

Associate Professor, Northeastern University
Professor Vicino specializes in the political economy of cities and suburbs, focusing on issues of metropolitan development, housing, and demographic analysis.
LW

Liza Weinstein

Northeastern University

Moderators
LA

Len Albright

Northeastern University

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua 309

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.16 Placemaking: Questioning the Role of Design in Creating Livable Cities and Neighborhoods


Mini-Charrette as a Method for Considering Urban Changes - After West Dallas Dream
Wayne Beggs, University of Texas at Arlington

Transforming Space into “Public” Space: Redesigning the Courtyard of the College of Science at Feng Chia University
Te-Sheng Huang, Feng Chia University; Li-Shin Chang, Feng Chia University; Peijia Zha, Rutgers University

Urban Design for Socially, Economically, and Environmentally Challenged Communities
Jennifer Sloan, University of Texas at Arlington

Speakers
WB

Wayne Beggs

University of Texas at Arlington
avatar for Te-Sheng Huang

Te-Sheng Huang

Feng Chia University

Moderators
avatar for Te-Sheng Huang

Te-Sheng Huang

Feng Chia University

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua Salon A/B

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.18 Comparing Global Visions of Community Development


The Flagship of Multiculturalism? An Investigation of Local Variations in Integration Regimes
Kristoffer Jutvik, Institute for Housing and Urban Research

Seeking Solutions to Long-Term Public Engagement in Rapidly Diversifying Communities: A Case Study in Washington County, OR
Meg Merrick, Portland State University; Andree Tremoulet, Portland State University

Revisiting the Black and Puerto Rican Political Convention: Tracking Black and Latino Empowerment in Newark
Akira Drake Rodriguez, Rutgers University - Newark



Speakers
avatar for Kristoffer Jutvik

Kristoffer Jutvik

PhD Student, Institute for Housing and Urban Research
Hi, My name is Kristoffer Jutvik and I work as a PhD student at the Institute for Housing and Urban Research. I took my bachelor’s degree from Linnaeus University in Kalmar and I later moved to Uppsala to attend the Master program in political science. After I graduated in 2013... Read More →
avatar for Meg Merrick

Meg Merrick

Research Associate and Community Geography Project Coordinator, Inst. of Portland Metropolitan Studies, PSU, Portland State University
I am passionate about cities, vibrant neighborhoods, meaningful public participation, architecture, mapping and maps, arts and culture, travel, and hiking - for a start.
AD

Akira Drake Rodriguez

Rutgers University - Newark

Moderators
AD

Akira Drake Rodriguez

Rutgers University - Newark

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua Salon F

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.19 Local Governments in Governance Times


Defining and Unpacking the Risks Municipal Officials Perceive in Interlocal Service Collaborations
Jered Carr, University of Illinois at Chicago; Michael Sicilano, University of Illinois at Chicago

Do Municipalities Share Services with Poorer Neighbors? Evidence From New York State
Mildred Warner, Cornell University; Bingxi Qian, Cornell University

Monopoly Politics: The Impact of Municipal Intervention in Michigan
Meghan Wilson, Brown University

How to Draw Lessons From Abroad: An Examination of Local Government Policy Transfer in Inter-Municipal Cooperation and Citizen Participation
Hal Wolman, George Washington University; William Barnes, George Washington University

Speakers
Moderators
HW

Hal Wolman, George Washington University

George Washington University

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua Salon C

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.20 Urban Social Movements in the 21st Century
The panel explores the nature and form of contemporary urban social movements. Papers in this panel examine the drivers and forces that shape contemporary urban social movements, similarities and differences with previous urban social movements; the roles of space, regulation, technology, and ideology in shaping them; as well as their potential and limitations. Papers draw on case studies and critical urban theory with a focus on issues of transportation, public space, immigration, right to the city, and marginalized social groups.

Incomplete Streets: Movements that Reclaim the Street from Property Owners, Cars and Pedestrians
Renia Ehrenfeucht, University of New Mexico

Observations from the Rise of a Regional Transportation Justice Coalition in the San Francisco Bay Area, 1998 - 2014
Aaron Golub, Portland State University; Alex Karner, Georgia Institute of Technology

Politicizing Undocumented Immigrants One Street Corner at a Time: How Day Laborers Became a Politically Contentious Group
Walter Nicholls, University of California, Irvine

Neglect and Punish: Neoliberalism, Informality, and Civil Disobedience as Everyday Practice
Nabil Kamel, Western Washington University

Destituent Power and The Right to the City: New Radical Theory in the Context of the Social Movements of 2011 and 2012
Silvano De la Llata, Concordia University

Speakers
NK

Nabil Kamel

Western Washington University
SD

Silvano De la Llata

Concordia University
avatar for Aaron Golub, PhD

Aaron Golub, PhD

Director, Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning, Portland State University
Dr. Golub is director of the Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning and a professor of urban studies & planning at Portland State University (PSU), moving to PSU after eight years at Arizona State University and ten years studying and working in the San Francisco Bay Area. His... Read More →

Moderators
SD

Silvano De la Llata

Concordia University

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Indigo Ballroom B

9:15am PDT

TH9.15.22 Tackling Climate Change


Addressing Climate Change and Extreme Weather: What Public Transit Agencies are Doing?
Qing Miao, Arizona State University; Eric Welch, Arizona State University; Fengxiu Zhang, Arizona State University

Carbon Emission Stress and Climate Commitment: A Qualitative Comparative Analysis of Local Policy Adoption in California
Andrew Pattison, California Lutheran University; Matthew Clement, Texas State University; Robert Habans, University of Illinois at Chicago

The Potentials of Sub-national Climate Action: Evidence from a Content Analysis of State Level Climate Action Plans
Serena Alexander, Cleveland State University

Speakers
SA

Serena Alexander

Cleveland State University
QM

Qing Miao

Arizona State University
AP

Andrew Pattison

California Lutheran University

Moderators
avatar for Ronald Vogel, Ryerson University

Ronald Vogel, Ryerson University

Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University
My research interests focus on metropolitan governance, global cities, and comparative urban politics.

Thursday March 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:40am PDT
Aqua 307

10:40am PDT

Thursday - Coffee Break
Thursday March 17, 2016 10:40am - 11:00am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

10:59am PDT

Thursday - Concurrent Sessions
Thursday March 17, 2016 10:59am - 12:25pm PDT
See session listing
  Panels

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.06 Theorizing Housing: What is the State of the Art?
“A central problem of much of housing studies is that it retains a myopic and narrow focus on housing policy and housing markets, and neglects broader issues. Housing studies is still far too isolated from debates and theories in the other social sciences and what is needed now is further integration into these.” Jim Kemeny, 1992. “Can we theorize about housing? If so, why is it that it is seldom attempted? There is an overly deprecatory quality to theorizing on housing, an almost apologetic sense that housing is not substantive enough for theory. Housing, it is argued, is not an academic discipline, lacking its own concepts and methodologies. We therefore cannot theorize from housing phenomena, but only bring existing social theories to bear on these phenomena.” Peter King, 2009. To help stimulate the application of theory to housing research, the journal Housing, Theory and Society was launched 31 years ago (first as Scandinavian Housing and Planning Research). This colloquy focuses on the current state of housing theory. We will also consider the distinction Kemeny and King make above; the former arguing that researchers need to engage with and bring social theory into the housing field while the latter considers how, if housing is a unique phenomenon, then it might need theory making in its own right. While seemingly opposed, the distinction here is more one of emphasis, providing different opportunities for theorizing housing. The speakers – some past and present editors of Housing, Theory and Society – will discuss past efforts to theorize housing and current opportunities and challenges given the role housing plays in shaping life outcomes, global markets, human rights and spatial inequality among other things. We will look at issues in Europe, the UK and the US including immigration, refuge, security, homelessness, social housing, ownership/tenure and supported housing.

Speakers
avatar for Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago

Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois Chicago
DC

David Clapham

University of Reading
avatar for James Fraser

James Fraser

Associate Professor, Vanderbilt University
avatar for Hannu Ruonavaara

Hannu Ruonavaara

Professor of Sociology, University of Turku, Finland
Theory and housing studies; neighbour relations; housing policy; comparative historical analysis. I am also the editor of Housing, Theory and Society, the only housing studies journal focusing on theory, published by Taylor & Francis.

Moderators
avatar for Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago

Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois Chicago

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Indigo 204A

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.10 Movements for Racial Justice In Urban Communities and Activist Scholars (ACTIVIST SCHOLARSHIP SESSION)
There are racial justice movements in every area of urban affairs, and scholars are present within these movements as both participants and analysts. Movements that oppose police violence, urban school district take-overs, profit-driven education and prison policies, and gentrification all find scholars involved both as participants and as sources of data and analysis. How do we assess the potential for racially just solutions? And how do scholar-activists see the effects of their participation? Kimberly Mayfield Lynch, Fred Ellis, and Kitty Kelly Epstein have both led and studied movements to transform aspects of the City of Oakland. In particular, they have campaigned against school district take-over, against barriers to the employment of African-Americans and Latinos in teaching and other fields; and against a political machine which threatened to dominate this historically activist city. A number of these campaigns have been relatively successful. Keith Benson is a high school teacher in Camden, New Jersey, a majority African-American city, and a graduate student at Rutgers University. He is both studying and acting on neoliberal practices in urban development and education reform. Stephen Danley, a professor at Rutgers University researches how policy makers and residents in Camden see the decisions that are made on education reform, public safety, police governance, and tax credits. Donna Hunter, a lecturer at Stanford University has examined, along with her colleague, Emily Polk, the contrasting responses of academia to two different movements, Black Lives Matter and Occupy. Panelists will briefly present the most interesting aspects of their work and then lead colloquy participants in a discussion of implications, contrasting examples, and future directions for activist scholarship on movements for racial justice.

Speakers
SD

Stephen Danley

Rutgers University
avatar for William (Fred) Ellis

William (Fred) Ellis

Holy Names University
Dr. Ellis was born the second son to a family enmeshed in the U.S. share-cropping system in an agricultural region of Georgia. He graduated from one of the most prestigious of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Morehouse College, and participated in the Southern Civil Rights... Read More →
avatar for Kitty Kelly Epstein

Kitty Kelly Epstein

Professor, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University
In 2013 Kitty Kelly Epstein was honored with the Activist Scholar Award at the national conference of the Urban Affairs Association.  This was based on her work in Oakland, California where she led an innovation in democracy that consisted of 41 groups comprised of 800 people whose... Read More →
avatar for Kimberly Mayfield Lynch, Holy Names University

Kimberly Mayfield Lynch, Holy Names University

Dean- School of Education, Holy Names Univeristy
Kimberly Mayfield is an Associate Professor and Dean of the School of Education at Holy Names University. She received her doctorate in Learning and Instruction from the University of San Francisco. Her research interests and activism include creating a permanent diverse teaching... Read More →
avatar for Keith Benson, Rutgers University

Keith Benson, Rutgers University

President, Camden Education Association

Moderators
avatar for Kitty Kelly Epstein

Kitty Kelly Epstein

Professor, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University
In 2013 Kitty Kelly Epstein was honored with the Activist Scholar Award at the national conference of the Urban Affairs Association.  This was based on her work in Oakland, California where she led an innovation in democracy that consisted of 41 groups comprised of 800 people whose... Read More →

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua Salon E

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.14 Community Based Research - Defining and Designing a Response to Coercive Sexual Environments
This session will focus on using a community-based research approach as a method for better understanding new public health concerns and other public policy challenges. The Urban Institute and University of California San Diego will describe their joint efforts in defining a new public health concept – coercive sexual environments (CSE) – and designing and testing an intervention in response. Dr. Sue Popkin will provide insights on how she better defined the problem using both quantitative and qualitative information from various research projects, and then developed a new validated scale to measure community levels of CSE. Dr. Jay Silverman will review the public health implications of exposure to CSE for adolescent girls, including vulnerability to a range of forms of gender-based violence (partner violence, sexual assault, sexual exploitation), adolescent pregnancy, and HIV. He will also discussed the limitations of school-based programming and the need for ‘place-based’ initiatives to address such these issues, using Promoting Adolescent Sexual Health and Safety (PASS) that includes complementary interventions for adolescent boys, girls and their adult care givers as an example. Elsa Falkenburger will share lessons learned from several of the community-based research methods used as part of the PASS project –building trust, sharing and interpreting data collaboratively with the community, and training community members to implement the intervention to improve service delivery and sustainability. The moderator will engage any willing colloquy participants to share their questions, experiences, and suggestions throughout the session.

Speakers
SP

Susan Popkin

Director, Program on Neighbhorhoods and Youth Development, Urban Institute
Susan J. Popkin is both Director of The Urban Institute’s Program on Neighborhoods and Youth Development and a Senior Fellow in the Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center. A nationally-recognized expert on public and assisted housing, Dr. Popkin directs a research program... Read More →
JS

Jay Silverman

University of California San Diego

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua 313

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.16 Boom, Bust and Beyond: Understanding the Economic, Governance and Planning Impacts of Shale Gas Drilling Across Regions
Boom-bust dynamics in the unconventional gas industry are already evident in many regions across the U.S. Technological changes in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing enabled development of the industry in new areas previously too difficult and unprofitable for gas extraction. Production surged in the late 2000s and early 2010s, but more recently has slowed with lower gas prices. The impacts of this cycle are widespread. They are certainly felt on regional economic development, but also on other aspects of planning, governance and regulation. This colloquy will focus on the interrelated impacts of shale gas drilling across different shale plays in the U.S. as the industry affects local and state governments. Speakers will address economic impact changes, planning developments, and effects on governance and regulation. We will discuss not only what has been done in different cases but what lies ahead in yet another boom-bust cycle of this (relatively new) resource extraction economy.

Speakers
TC

Teresa Cordova

Director, University of Illinois at Chicago/Great Cities Institute
CL

Carolyn Loh

Wayne State University
avatar for Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

University of Pittsburgh
Sabina Deitrick, PhD, is Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and Director of Urban and Regional Analysis program at the University Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR) at the University of Pittsburgh.  Her research focuses on issues... Read More →
AT

Andrew Thomas

Cleveland State University
avatar for Iryna Lendel, Cleveland State University

Iryna Lendel, Cleveland State University

Assistant Director, Center for Economic Development, Cleveland State University

Moderators
avatar for Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

University of Pittsburgh
Sabina Deitrick, PhD, is Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and Director of Urban and Regional Analysis program at the University Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR) at the University of Pittsburgh.  Her research focuses on issues... Read More →

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua Salon D

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.21 Journal Publishing: What Editors Think You Should Know
Experienced editors from major publishing companies explain the basic guidelines for preparing and submitting manuscripts, and proven strategies for potential authors. Learn to avoid common mistakes, and increase the likelihood of finding the most appropriate journal for your research.

Fiona Counsell, Routledge/Taylor & Francis
Kay Tancock, Elsevier Publishing
Patrick McGinty, SAGE Publishing
 

Speakers
avatar for Fiona Counsell

Fiona Counsell

Managing Editor, Routledge | Taylor & Francis
Looking forward to UAA 2016! Delegates are most welcome to talk to me about publishing, particularly journal publishing. Happy to discuss getting published, the journal process, marketing your research and yourself, social media, digital media, Open Access and more.
avatar for Kay Tancock

Kay Tancock

Publisher - Geography, Planning & Development, Elsevier Ltd.
Kay Tancock is a Publisher of Geography, Planning and Development journals at Elsevier in Oxford, UK. She manages a portfolio of 20 academic journals in this disciplinary field. Kay will be running a stand in the exhibitors' area, providing information on many aspects of publishing... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Fiona Counsell

Fiona Counsell

Managing Editor, Routledge | Taylor & Francis
Looking forward to UAA 2016! Delegates are most welcome to talk to me about publishing, particularly journal publishing. Happy to discuss getting published, the journal process, marketing your research and yourself, social media, digital media, Open Access and more.

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Indigo Ballroom B

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.01 Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience in Asia: Cases from Vietnam, India and Indonesia
Vulnerability and resilience have taken root among scholars and practitioners of urban planning and policy, yet there is no agreed-upon set of conceptual frameworks from which to develop scalable and effective policies and plans. The regions of Asia are particularly hard-hit by natural and other hazards, partly because of natural conditions, and partly because of rapid urbanization and growth. Using cases from Vietnam, India and Indonesia, as well as theoretical perspectives on decentralization, community-level urban infrastructure, and democracy, this panel seeks to provide some direction on resilience and vulnerability that deals equally with social, built-environment, and natural processes.

Vulnerability Assessment of Tsunamis Along the Central Coast of Vietnam
Jiwnath Ghimire, University of Hawai'i at Manoa

Participatory Urbanization in Southeast Asia: The Infrastructure of Democracy
James Spencer, Clemson University

Variations in Household Exposure to Flood Hazards in Informal Settlements: A Study of Kolkata, India
Andrew Rumbach, University of Colorado at Denver; Manish Shirgaokar, University of Alberta

Shelter Policies and Resilience: Tracing the Evolution and Impacts of Interventions in Surabaya, Indonesia
Ashok Das, University of Hawai'i at Manoa

Speakers
JG

Jiwnath Ghimire

University of Hawai'i at Manoa
AD

Ashok Das, University of Hawaii at Manoa

University of Hawaii at Mānoa
AR

Andrew Rumbach

University of Colorado Denver
JS

James Spencer

Associate Dean, Clemson University

Sponsors
Moderators
JS

James Spencer

Associate Dean, Clemson University

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Indigo 202A

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.02 Continuities and Change in the Urban Housing Market in East Asia


Enclave Urbanism in Korea: The Gated Effect of Large-Scale Apartment Development
Sun-Hye Bae, Seoul National University; Hyo-Jin Kim, Seoul National University

Housing Abandonment in Incheon, South Korea and the Resident’s Perception on Abandonment
Youngmee Jeon, Seoul National University; Youngsoo You, Seoul National University; HeeChul Kim, Seoul National University

Residential Transformation of the Infill Housing Replacement Pattern: Cases in Seoul From 2001 to 2013
Hyojin Kim, Seoul National University

The Value of Residents’ Community in Tokyo: The Impacts of Social Interaction Among Residents and Shared Spaces on Condominium Resale Values
Kayo Tajima, Rikkyo University

Speakers
SB

Sun-Hye Bae

Graduate program in Urban Design, Seoul National University
YJ

Youngmee Jeon

Seoul National University
HK

Hyojin Kim

Seoul National University
avatar for Kayo Tajima

Kayo Tajima

Associate Professor, Rikkyo University
I am working on empirical/quantitative research on urban issues in Japan. My research centers around housing and urban living environment (i.e. green spaces, air pollution, community development). I also study the impacts of natural disasters on urban quality of life and the ec... Read More →

Sponsors
Moderators
avatar for Kayo Tajima

Kayo Tajima

Associate Professor, Rikkyo University
I am working on empirical/quantitative research on urban issues in Japan. My research centers around housing and urban living environment (i.e. green spaces, air pollution, community development). I also study the impacts of natural disasters on urban quality of life and the ec... Read More →

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Indigo 202B

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.04 Urban Planning Across the Border in a Global Age: Projects and Debates
In a globalizing world, the spaces around international boundaries are increasingly complex. On the one hand, border regions have become magnets for what might be generally labeled “cross-border integration,” in the form of labor markets, trade relationships, tourism flows, cultural exchanges or ecosystems that call for innovation. Scholars have thus begun to understand cross-border space, not as a zone that merely separates two nations and needs to be defended, but as a setting for “debordering” or the removal of fortified boundaries. On the other hand, global terrorism, border crime, narcotics smuggling and other developments have caused some nations to engage in what scholars term “rebordering”, the building of new fences, walls and other forms of border security. Given these different forces at play we are moving toward an era of “bordering dynamics,” the interplay of the forces that seek to reinsert the physical border as a kind of barrier, and those that would imagine cross-border daily urban systems or what some call the “transfrontier metropolis.” This panel addresses the question of urban planning across borders in this context, and will tackle four perspectives, at different scales, from micro to macro: first, the idea of building models of shared food, water and energy systems in the context of climate change and cross-border metropolitan space. A second paper explores an ecological revitalization plan for the cross-border river zone in the Tijuana-San Diego metropolis. A third paper examines the dialectic between urban planning of the border crossing zone and downtown Tijuana, illustrating the ongoing conflicts between neighboring spaces that are seemingly integrated but divided by global politics. The final paper offers a geopolitical and theoretical exploration of the notions of rebordering and debordering in the 21st century.

Climate Change and the Food-Energy-Water Trilemma: Challenges for Planning in the US-Mexico Border Region
Keith Pezzoli, University of California, San Diego

Tijuana Solar River: Ecological Restoration Along the Border
Rene Peralta, Woodbury University

Placemaking, the New Debordering and the Resurgence of Tijuana, Mexico
Lawrence Herzog, San Diego State University

The Cross-Border Metropolis Caught Between Debordering and Rebordering: A Plea for a Reflexive Urbanism
Christophe Sohn, Luxembourg Institute of Socio- Economic Research

Speakers
LH

Lawrence Herzog

San Diego State University
RP

Rene Peralta

Woodbury University
KP

Keith Pezzoli

University of California, San Diego
CS

Christophe Sohn

Luxembourg Institute of Socio- Economic Research

Sponsors
Moderators
LH

Lawrence Herzog

San Diego State University

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua Salon F

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.07 Governmental Impacts on Affordable Housing Development


Opportunity for Whom? The Neighborhoods of LIHTC Tenants
Yiwen Kuai, University of California, Los Angeles; Ingrid Gould Ellen, New York University; Keren Mertens Horn, University of Massachusetts Boston

Measuring the Magnitude of the Effect of Affordable Housing on Nearby Property Values: A Meta-Analysis
Mai Ngueyn, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Hye-Sung Han, University of Missouri, Kansas City

Affordable Housing in Legacy Cities: Challenges and Solutions
J. Rosie Tighe, Cleveland State University

An Analysis of Locational Opportunity Provision in the Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program
Rebecca Walter, The University of Texas at San Antonio; Ruoniu (Vince) Wang, University of Florida; Sarah Jones, The University of Texas at San Antonio

Low-Income Housing and Green Building: Examining Sustainability Priorities in the LIHTC Program
Anaid Yerena, University of Washington-Tacoma; Victoria Basolo, University of California, Irvine

Speakers
avatar for Mai Nguyen

Mai Nguyen

Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
avatar for J. Rosie Tighe

J. Rosie Tighe

Associate Professor, Cleveland State University
RW

Rebecca Walter

The University of Texas at San Antonio
avatar for Anaid Yerena

Anaid Yerena

University of Washington Tacoma

Moderators
avatar for Anaid Yerena

Anaid Yerena

University of Washington Tacoma

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Indigo 204B

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.08 Changes in Housing Markets and Home Buying


Housing Submarket Classification in Franklin County, Ohio – Longitudinal Analysis Between 2005 and 2015
Yumi Choi, The Ohio State University; Bernadette Hanlon, The Ohio State University

“It has Been so Long, I have Just Basically Given up”: Homebuying Difficulties of Low-Income Renters
Mark Lindblad, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill; Hye-Sung Han, University of Missouri-Kansas City; Siyun Yu, UNC-Chapel Hill; Bill Rohe, UNC-Chapel Hill

Losing Their Place in Line: Reduced Housing Opportunities for Young People in Los Angeles Neighborhoods
Sarah L. Mawhorter, University of Southern California

Stuck in Subprime? Examining Refinancing Barriers for Subprime Borrowers
Carolina Reid, University of California, Berkeley; Lauren Lambie-Hanson, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia

Jump-Starting the Housing Market in a Shrinking City: A Comparative Analysis of Downtown and Midtown Detroit
Avis C. Vidal, Wayne State University

Speakers
YC

Yumi Choi

Ph.D Student, The Ohio State University
ML

Mark Lindblad

UNC-Chapel Hill Center for Community Capital
SL

Sarah L. Mawhorter

University of Southern California

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Indigo 206

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.09 Justice for All? Institutional Challenges and Alternatives
Moderator: Rod Hissong, University of Texas at Arlington

Transgressing Beyond Politics and Rhetoric: Quantitative and Spatial Analytical Strategies for Refining Contemporary Policing
Roger J. Chin, Claremont Graduate University

The Process and Impact of a Deferred Felony Prosecution Program in Cook County, Illinois

Christine C George, Loyola University Chicago; Jennifer Cossyleon, loyola University Chicago; John Orwat, Loyola University Chicago; Don Stemens, Loyola University Chicago

Waiting for Their Day in Court: Who Gets Bail, Who Doesn’t and Does It Affect Outcome?
Rod Hissong, University of Texas at Arlington



Speakers
RJ

Roger J. Chin

Claremont Graduate University
avatar for Christine George

Christine George

Associate Research Professor, Loyola University Chicago
RH

Rod Hissong

University of Texas at Arlington

Moderators
RH

Rod Hissong

University of Texas at Arlington

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua 311B

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.11 Teens and the Fraying Safety Net
In the wake of the Great Recession, the combination of declining wage and job opportunities and ever more limited support from the federal safety net has put tremendous stress on low income families that has consequences for youth living in these households. This panel will explore teen food insecurity, the economic role that many young people play to help their families make ends meet, the long-term consequences of this role, as well as implications for both federal policy and community efforts to support youth and their families.

Stepping up to Make Ends Meet: The Role of Teens in Food Insecure Families
Molly Scott, The Urban Institute; Susan Popkin, The Urban Institute; Abigail Baum, The Urban Institute; David Blount, The Urban Institute; Sade Adeeyo, The Urban Institute

Long Term Consequences of Youth Taking on Early Economic Responsibility in Their Families
Sierra Latham, The Urban Institute; Molly Scott, The Urban Institute; Heather Koball, The Urban Institute

Exploring a Community-Based Approach to Addressing Teen Food Insecurity
Martha Galvez, The Urban Institute; Susan Popkin, The Urban Institute; Priya Saxena, the Urban Institute; David Blount, The Urban Institute; Sade Adeeyo, The Urban Institute

Building a Curriculum to Support Youth-Led Solutions to Teen Food Insecurity
David Blount, The Urban Institute; Martha Galvez, The Urban Institute; Susan Popkin, the Urban Institute; Priya Saxena, the Urban Institute; Sade Adeeyo, the Urban Institute

Speakers
DB

David Blount

The Urban Institute
SL

Sierra Latham

Research Associate, Urban Institute
MS

Molly Scott

Senior Research Associate, The Urban Institute
Teen employment, good jobs strategies

Moderators
MS

Molly Scott

Senior Research Associate, The Urban Institute
Teen employment, good jobs strategies

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua 305

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.12 Perceiving and Understanding Changing Population Diversity


Projecting the Demographic Future of a City
Simon Choi, Southern California Association of Governments; Frank Wen, Southern California Association of Governments

The Importance of Representativeness: Diversity and Perceptions of Diversity in Virginia’s Planning Profession
Margaret Cowell, Virginia Tech

Life Cycle of Immigrant Community Organizations in the Deep South Urban Areas
Chi-kan Richard Hung, University of Massachusetts Boston

The Racial Hierarchy and Racial Transition of Ascending Neighborhoods in the U.S.
Ann Owens, University of Southern California; Jennifer Candipan, University of Southern California

Speakers
SC

Simon Choi

Southern California Association of Governments
avatar for Margaret Cowell, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Margaret Cowell, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Margaret Cowell, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Urban Affairs and Planning at Virginia Tech. Her research focuses on economic development, urban economy, and public policy. Her research has been funded by the MacArthur Foundation and United States Economic Development Administr... Read More →

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua 314

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.13 Advancing Disaster Planning and Preparedness


Sensing Space: Augmenting Scientific Data with Spatial Ethnography
Yoh Kawano, University of California, Los Angeles

Challenging Local Traditions in a Changing Environment: Impacts of Local Identities on Planning for Disaster Risk Management in the Sub-Carpathians
Teresa Sprague, Institute of Spatial Planning, Technical University Dortmund

Urban Form-Based Adaptations to Extreme Sea Level Events for Waterfront Development
Liangliang Wang, Xiamen University; Chye Kiang Heng, National University of Singapore; Jie Han, Xiamen University

Speakers
YK

Yoh Kawano

University of California, Los Angeles
TS

Teresa Sprague

Institute of Spatial Planning, Technical University Dortmund
LW

Liangliang Wang

XIAMEN UNIVERSTIY

Moderators
avatar for Jocelyn Taliaferro

Jocelyn Taliaferro

Associate Professor & Director of The Graduate Program, North Carolina State University
If you only look at what is, you might never attain what could be!

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua 309

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.15 Integrated City Sustainability
Although cities have been called the “key battlegrounds” for global sustainability and recognized as leaders and innovators in climate protection and sustainability policy, in depth empirical studies of their efforts have been thwarted by data limitations. Data about local sustainability policy is typically collected via surveys administered to local government officials and has been used to examine a series of questions about the factors that drive cities to make sustainability commitments or pursue select initiatives. However, questions about the process of implementation, program management, and policy change over time have remained understudied. The three papers in this panel describe and illustrate an effort to overcome these data challenges and examine city-based sustainability efforts in more meaningful ways. The Integrated City Sustainability Database (ICSD) is a long-term effort to create a comprehensive dataset on sustainability local sustainability policy in the United States. When completed it will contain nearly full coverage for cities’ 2010 baseline efforts. The ICSD will be made public to the scholarly and practitioner community in order to facilitate research on local sustainability initiatives. This panel is intended to comprehensively describe and illustrate the ICSD.

An Introduction to the Integrated City Sustainability Database: Purpose and Methods
Richard C. Feiock, Florida State University

An Illustration of the ICSD: An Assessment of the Factors that Lead Collaboration for Sustainability
Christopher V. Hawkins, University of Central Florida

Using the ICSD to Examine Changes to Local Sustainability Policy 2010-2015
Rachel M. Krause, University of Kansas; Vanessa Balta-Cook, University of Central Florida

Speakers
VB

Vanessa Balta-Cook

University of Central Florida
RF

Richard Feiock

Florida State University
CH

Christopher Hawkins

University of Central Florida

Moderators
CH

Christopher Hawkins

University of Central Florida

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua 307

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.17 Urban Redevelopment: New and Renewed Approaches


Promise Zones: A Process Evaluation
Ljubinka Andonoska, University of Texas at El Paso; Scott McDonald, University of Texas at El Paso

The Transition From Informal to Formal in Post-Industrial Cities: The Case of Live/Work
Andreanne Doyon, The University of Melbourne

Revitalizing Legacy Cities in the 21st Century: The Role of Foundations
Mary Rocco, University of Pennsylvania

Policy Recommendations for Fostering Economic Development Through Social Capital
Barry Rubin, Indiana University; Trent A. Engbers, University of Southern Indiana



Speakers
LA

Ljubinka Andonoska

Assistant Professor, University of Texas at El Paso
avatar for Andreanne Doyon

Andreanne Doyon

PhD Candidate, The University of Melbourne
I am in the final year of my PhD at The University of Melbourne. My field of studies is urban planning, with particular interests in the process of change in cities, governance, sustainable development and urban resilience, and land use. Previously I completed a MA Planning at The... Read More →
MR

Mary Rocco

Doctoral Candidate, University of Pennsylvania
BR

Barry Rubin

Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University

Moderators
MR

Mary Rocco

Doctoral Candidate, University of Pennsylvania

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua Salon A/B

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.18 The Post-Demolition City
The idea that housing demolition can have generative qualities has advanced considerably in recent years as federal, state, and local officials fund the eradication of blight in disinvested neighborhoods, and spate of studies carefully detail the impacts of neighborhood deterioration. Though the microscopic externality effect of blight eradication (i.e. influence of demolition on nearby house values, crime, and public health) has been well-tested, other questions remain comparatively under-examined. What are the broader institutional forces behind demolition-heavy urban policy approaches? What is the accumulated impact of demolitions in already-disinvested neighborhoods? Are there signs of market reversal and social stabilization, or have conditions continued to deteriorate? Are there any policy measures (e.g. side lots, community gardens, etc.) appropriately scaled to repurpose the increased amount of vacant land being produced by such demolitions? Are cities (or land banks) institutionally capable of handling the likely increase in tax reverted properties? This session will consist of historical and contemporary papers examining the larger consequences of demolition-heavy urban policy.

Demolition as Urban Policy in the American Rust Belt
Jason Hackworth, University of Toronto

When It Comes to U.S. Shrinking Cities, What Do We Mean?
Joanna Ganning, University of Utah; Rosie Tighe, Cleveland State University

Revitalization and Stabilization Through Historic Preservation: Case Studies of Two St. Louis Neighborhoods
Kelly Kinahan, Cleveland State University



Speakers
JG

Joanna Ganning

University of Utah
KK

Kelly Kinahan

Cleveland State University

Moderators
JG

Joanna Ganning

University of Utah

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua Salon C

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.19 Building Walkable Communities: A Detroit Regional Context
The panel focuses on exploring accessibility in urban and suburban contexts within the Detroit Region. The various analyses will build and explore measures of accessibility while isolating for socio-demographic variables (including income, race, age and gender in conditioning accessibility), quantifying pedestrian activity, and examining potential associations with physical activity and obesity, including theoretically integrated under complex systems, urban design, and social structures. The different papers will examine the interplay and dynamics of urban form, travel behavior, physical activity, and obesity within the context of diverse socioeconomic conditions and race/ethnic populations within the Detroit Region.

Using Agent-Based Modeling to Study the Dynamics of Travel, Food Access, and Shopping Patterns in the Detroit Lower-East Side
Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University; Arika Ligmann-Zielinska, Michigan State University; Timothy LeDoux, Westfield State University

Travel Behavior: Who is Responsible for Environmental Burdens?
Zeenat Kotval-K, Michigan State University; Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University

Dining Out in Detroit: An Analysis of the Restaurant Travel Behaviors Reported by Residents of Two Detroit Neighborhoods
Jeanette Eckert, Michigan State University; Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University

‘Transportation Disadvantaged’: Urban Form and Gendered Travel Behavior in the Detroit Region
Jieun Lee, Hunter College-City University of New York; Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University; Sue Grady, Michigan State University

Speakers
avatar for Zeenat Kotval-K

Zeenat Kotval-K

Michigan State University
JL

Jieun Lee

Farmingdale State College-SUNY
IV

Igor Vojnovic

Michigan State University

Moderators
IV

Igor Vojnovic

Michigan State University

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua 311A
  Panels

11:00am PDT

TH11.00.20 Exploring The State as 'Vexed Institution' in Urban Politics and Policy
At last year’s colloquy, “Assessing the Role of the State in the Contemporary Urban,” several presenters explored the role of the state as either a positive force or a coercive force, with some panelists concluding that, though flawed, the state is “all we have” for advancing democracy in cities. This panel builds on last year’s colloquy by investigating how urbanists theorize and interrogate the state in empirical research, while understanding it as a complex and “vexed” institution. Moving beyond the argument about whether the state is “good” or “bad,” this panel asks how researchers take seriously in empirical work the notion that the state is, inherently, multiple. Multiplicity implies physical form or site, identity or goal, and a normative dimension. That is, the state consists of numerous institutions and actors pursuing various goals and exercising power in ways that are progressive, or potentially so, regressive, coercive and violent. How do scholars employ theoretically and empirically a complex conception of the state in urban research? Using lenses including “the differentiated state”, multi-level governance, the multiple state, and the imagined state, and applying them to the substantive policy areas of immigration policy, post-disaster recovery, and participatory budgeting, these papers offer theoretical and substantive examples of how to approach the state at this level of complexity in urban research.

“Differentiated States”: Disparate Governing Regimes in Rockaway, Queens
Leigh Graham, The City University of New York

Whither Redemocratizing Democracy in an Era of Austerity: New York's Recent Experiences With Participatory Budgeting
Celina Su, Brooklyn College

The Multiple State and the Local Politics of Immigrant Integration
Mara Sidney, Rutgers University-Newark

The Imagined State: Undocumented Migration and State Sovereignty
Beth Baker, California State University, Los Angeles

Speakers
BB

Beth Baker

California State University, Los Angeles
LG

Leigh Graham, John Jay College, CUNY

John Jay College of Criminal Justice
MS

Mara Sidney

Rutgers University-Newark

Moderators
AM

Alejandra Marchevsky

California State University, Los Angeles

Thursday March 17, 2016 11:00am - 12:25pm PDT
Aqua 310B

12:25pm PDT

1:29pm PDT

Thursday - Concurrent Sessions
Thursday March 17, 2016 1:29pm - 2:55pm PDT
See session listing
  Panels

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.06 Critical Appraisal of Don Norris' 'Metropolitan Governance in America'
The panelists will provide their critical appraisals of the contribution of Don Norris' METROPOLITAN GOVERNANCE IN AMERICA to the study of this important subject.

Speakers
DF

Donald F. Norris, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Director, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Donald F. Norris (a.k.a. Don – definitely not Donald!) is Director of the School of Public Policy and Director of the Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis and Research at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. His fields of study include: (1) urban affairs broadly but with... Read More →
RF

Richard Feiock

Florida State University
HW

Hal Wolman, George Washington University

George Washington University


Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua 310B

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.09 Surfacing Counternarratives in Racial Justice: Examining Impact and Implications in Community-Based Research (ACTIVIST SCHOLARSHIP SESSION)
(UAA-SAGE- and URBAN-sponsored colloquy) We propose to examine participatory and community-based research addressing issues of racial (in)justice in the United States. How does such work inform critical theories on how and why racial injustice currently manifests in specific ways? What policy implications and next steps might we glean? What practices might we engage in, to better serve communities? We hope to highlight innovative methodologies and approaches, and emerging insights, in such work. How do state policies currently reify racial hierarchies, and how do those on the ground resist injustice? Panelists will address these questions in the context of research projects on racial inequalities in mass incarceration, deportation, surveillance, and public budgets, and structure remarks in ways to encourage discussion with those in the audience. Beth Baker and Alejandra Marchevsky will reflect upon their research on U.S. deportation and immigrant detention policies, focusing on a collaborative, multi-media project they are developing with immigrant working-class students and an immigrant rights organization in Los Angeles. They will examine how insights and narratives from this project talk back to federal- and state-level mass incarceration and deportation policies. Whitney Richards-Calathes will draw upon her work as a researcher working on restorative Los Angeles and New York, discuss how power inequalities often reproduce traditional definitions of “expertise” in community-based research, and reflect upon the creation of a community-based research center and federal IRB. Cory Greene will draw upon his work with the Morris Justice Project, to examine the “non-negotiables” of community-based research as a tool in social justice, including the importance of radical inclusivity. Celina Su will examine participatory budgeting in New York, to examine how community-based initiatives ironically often reify rather than lessen racial inequalities, especially on education and policing issues, and what practices might be implemented in response. Greg Squires will moderate.

Speakers
BB

Beth Baker-Cristales

California State University-Los Angeles
AG

Andrew Greene

Healing Justice Organizer
Cory Greene is a formerly incarcerated co founder and organizer with How Our Lives link Altogether! Cory is currently invested in developing and supporting the development of an inter-generational youth led city-wide Healing Justice Movement.
AM

Alejandra Marchevsky

California State University, Los Angeles
WR

Whitney Richards-Calathes

CUNY-Graduate Center
Whitney works with the YJC coordinating action-based research and supporting organizing work. She is a student that studies alternatives to mass incarceration at The Graduate Center in NYC. She is from the Bronx.

Moderators
GS

Gregory Squires

Professor of Sociology, George Washington University

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua Salon E

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.12 Neoliberalism and Urban Policy/Political Development in the U.S. and U.K.
This roundtable presents an analysis of Timothy Weaver’s new book, Blazing the Neoliberal Trail: Urban Political Development in the U.S. and the U.K., just published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. Weaver examines how the ideas and policies of “neoliberalism”— tax cuts, deregulation, slashing the welfare state — shaped urban policy and political development in cities in the U.K. and the U.S., while examining the role cities themselves played in promoting and constructing the neoliberal turn. The book draws on extensive archival research and interviews with key political actors to examine national-level policies, such as enterprise zones—place-based articulations of neoliberal ideas—and places through case studies of Philadelphia and London’s “Docklands.” Weaver argues that politicians like Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher targeted urban areas as part of their far broader effort to remake the relationship between the market, state, and citizen. But while neoliberalization occurred in both countries, there is variation in the ways in which neoliberal ideas interacted with institutional frameworks and organized interests. Furthermore, these developments were not limited to a 1980s right-wing effort, but were also advanced by Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, whose “third-way” ultimately reinforced the neoliberal ideas and practices, though often by default rather than design. The enduring impact of these shifts is illustrated by President Obama’s recent announcement of “Promise Zones,” which despite appearances are cast in a neoliberal mold.

Speakers
CA

Carolyn Adams

Temple University
avatar for Jonathan Davies

Jonathan Davies

Director - Centre for Urban Research on Austerity, De Montfort University
I am Director of the Centre for Urban Research on Austerity at De Montfort University in Leicester, UK. See http://cura.our.dmu.ac.uk for further information about the Centre. I am a political sociologist, studying urban governance from a Gramscian point of view.I am about to enter... Read More →
CJ

Cedric Johnson, University of Illinois—Chicago

University of Illinois at Chicago
JR

Joel Rast, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
avatar for Timothy Weaver

Timothy Weaver

University of Louisville

Moderators
DI

David Imbroscio

University of Louisville

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua Salon C

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.14 Opportunities in Emerging Tech Cities
Since the Industrial Revolution, no singular industry has physically altered cities nationwide as significantly as the technology sector. In this tech-dominated era, traditional urban planning is not equipped to react to and sustain constantly changing tech-focused environments. As the sector grows, cities must accommodate infrastructure, housing, and transportation necessary to sustain the growing workforce. This “problem” offers planners an unprecedented opportunity to diverge from long-term master plans of traditional planning, and embrace the dynamic planning required for the twenty-first century. Broadly, technology and innovation coupled with planning and development can be directly utilized to cater to citizens’ constantly changing needs in times of prosperity and turmoil. Cities cluster people and resources, which sparks creative forms of citizen-based innovation in technology and their surrounding environment. Specifically, since the public planning process can experience bureaucratic delays or resistance to change, public-private partnerships benefit both sides and allow for the necessary flexibility inherent to entrepreneurial planning. When planners and developers work together, they not only better adapt to shifts in the market, but also identify unique solutions to the challenges and opportunities new tech hubs bring to the built environment. The speakers will discuss major tech cities and ways in which the public sector instigates economic development and value-creation through entrepreneurial planning. Public sector representatives—Kevin Keller, Director of Planning for the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Economic Development, and Darin Dinsmore, of CrowdBrite—will discuss the public sector’s role in steering development toward citywide goals. Southern California developer Howard Kozloff, Managing Partner of Agora Partners, will discuss ways in which developers work within established public policies to achieve desirable outcomes. Overall, these speakers will emphasize the role of partnerships between planners and developers to capitalize on city-building opportunities while meeting public goals and objectives.

Speakers
KK

Kevin Keller

Los Angeles Mayor's Office of Economic Development
HK

Howard Kozloff

Agora Partners

Moderators
HK

Howard Kozloff

Agora Partners

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua Salon A/B

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.20 Market Logics in Housing Policy and Practice: An Exploration of the Relationship Between Financialization and Privatization
The domination of housing policy by market logic is a central feature of neoliberal urbanism, in theory and practice. But subsumed within the category of ‘market logic’ are diverse processes and frameworks, including privatization (selling or transferring public assets to private ownership) and financialization (the influence of financial logics, actors, and practices in “non-financial” domains). In this colloquy speakers will draw on insights from research in the realm of housing, considering the interrelations and tensions between financialization and privatization through addressing questions like: • Where do privatization and financialization overlap, co-exist, and/or differ? Are they in conflict, and if so how? • What are the spatial and temporal dynamics of financialization and privatization? • What is the role of the state in promoting these logics? • How are these frameworks subject to political contestation? • What research is needed to address these questions, and to expand the inquiry to other urban policy domains? Fields discusses how the state’s privileging of the interests of markets, financial institutions, and investors before and after the 2008 crisis have reinforced and extended financialization into the rental market. Teresa examines how the state manages financialization in privatized affordable housing production as an individualized-tenant legal problem, and how this approach circumscribes and/or provides new routes for collective political action. Khare discusses how the nexus of federal deregulation policy and political influence by an elite governing coalition coalesced to advance the privatization and financialization of Chicago’s public housing in the post-recession period, though not without organized resistance. Dozier discusses a second-wave property-tax revolt of Southern California’s propertied elites’ use of state property-tax levee policy, which sought to produce affordable housing, but with elite planning subsidized and privatized urban redevelopment. Guimond investigates the work that new flows of capital into low-income housing do to overcome multiple forms of difference and make disinvested areas sites of accumulation.

Speakers
DD

Deshonay Dozier

The Graduate Center of the City University of New York
Deshonay Dozier is a member of the Black Men and Boys Street PAR collective with the Los Angeles Community Action Network. Her research and activism is on policing, gentrification, and shared equity housing.
DF

Desiree Fields

University of Sheffield
CG

Catherine Guimond

San Francisco Art Institute
avatar for Amy Khare

Amy Khare

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Chicago
Amy Khare’s research seeks to shape solutions to persistent poverty and structural inequality, with a specific focus on affordable housing, community development, and market-driven policies. Her central line of inquiry examines how urban politics influences the privatization of... Read More →
BT

Benjamin Teresa

The Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Moderators
avatar for Amy Khare

Amy Khare

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Chicago
Amy Khare’s research seeks to shape solutions to persistent poverty and structural inequality, with a specific focus on affordable housing, community development, and market-driven policies. Her central line of inquiry examines how urban politics influences the privatization of... Read More →

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Indigo Ballroom B

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.01 Rural Migrants in Transitional Urban China: Marginality, Agency and Social Justice (II)
Rural migrants in transitional urban China have received extensive scholarly attention from all social sciences disciplines. While the large corpus of studies on this peculiar social group have unraveled in depth their unequal access to citizenship, relatively less effort has been made to examine theoretically the uneven structure of power in which rural migrants are located. Yet, this structure of uneven power specifies an identity category that feeds into a variety of exploitative relations, not simply in the domain of economy, but in all aspects of the lifeworld. As Fulong Wu (2010) trenchantly argues, the curtailing of migrant welfare and the sequestration of this social group to a “state of exception” serves the state to preserve China’s competitiveness in a global market. Also, as the three proposed panels attempt to cast some light, the state manipulates and appropriates differentiated citizenship to advance various ends of governance. As such, the cohort of authors assembled here avoid reading migrants’ marginality simply from an institutional perspective, but rather hope to examine the material socio-spatial processes in which marginality unfolds, evolves and constitutes social relations. In other words, we gauge the implications for social justice from the entry point of everyday life and mundane social, economic and cultural transactions. This approach thus enables scholars to attend to migrants’ agency to respond to and negotiate institutional infrastructure, by adopting a more interactive approach towards migrants’ lived experiences and their relation to the state. This panel is a continuation of the one submitted by Dr Junxi Qian, entitled Rural migrants in transitional urban China: marginality, agency and social justice (I). This second panel tries to unpack the status quo of migrants’ mundane lifeworld in the context of the dynamic socio-spatial restructuring of Chinese cities.

To Move or to Stay in a Migrant Enclave in Beijing: The Role of Neighborhood Social Bonds

Chaolin Gu, Tsinghua University; Mingjie Sheng, Tsinghua University; Weiping Wu, Tufts University

Inter-City Migration in China: A Recurrent-Event Duration Analysis of Repeat Migration
Ming Tian, Beijing Normal University; Zheng Tian, Capital University of Economics and Business

Precarious Geography: The Relentless Mobility of Cultural Labors in China
Jun Wang, City University of Hong Kong; Yan Li, City University of Hong Kong



Speakers
CG

Chaolin Gu

Tsinghua University
MT

Ming Tian, Beijing Normal University

Beijing Normal University
avatar for Jun Wang

Jun Wang

Assistant Professor, City University of Hong Kong

Sponsors
Moderators
avatar for Jun Wang

Jun Wang

Assistant Professor, City University of Hong Kong

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Indigo 202A

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.02 Housing Inequality and Local Communities in Comparative Perspective


Community Associations and Local Government Budget: Substitutional or Complementary?
Hai (David) Guo, Florida International University; Shaoming Cheng, Florida International University

Social Embeddedness and Community Collective Economy Development: Urban China Community as a Case Study
Jianjun He, China Jiliang University; Jing Wang, California State Polytechnic University

Annexation and the Happiness of Residents in the Transforming Communities in China: A Social Network Analysis
Weiwei Zhang, Zhejiang University of Finance & Economic, China; Jing Wang, California State Polytechnic University

The Housing Process of Chinese Immigrants in Canada
Jing Zhao, University of British Columbia

Speakers
HD

Hai David Guo, Florida International University

Florida International University
JZ

Jing Zhao

University of British Columbia

Sponsors
Moderators
JZ

Jing Zhao

University of British Columbia

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Indigo 202B

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.03 Urban Global South: Understanding Environmental and Residential Choices
Moderator/Session Coordinator: Ana Sabogal, Catholic University-Peru

Building Civic Environmentalism in the Urban Global South: The Case of São Paulo’s Zeladoria Ambiental
Kristine Stiphany, The University of Texas at Austin

Social Network Proximity Preferences in Residential Location Choice in Bogotá, Colombia: Evidence from a Stated Preference Field Experiment


Aiga Stokenberga, Stanford University

Speakers
avatar for Kristine Stiphany

Kristine Stiphany

Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University
Kristine Stiphany is a registered architect and urban planner whose research, practice, and teaching focus upon housing and urbanization in Latin America, and on the sociospatial evolution of informal settlements. Stiphany is the founder of the Chapa Urban Lab (www.chapa.io), a citizen-sourced... Read More →
AS

Aiga Stokenberga

PhD student, Stanford University
My research combines concepts and methods from land use and transportation economics, urban sociology, and urban design in an effort to understand the environmental, social, and economic sustainability implications of urban planning interventions targeting low-income populations... Read More →

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Indigo 204A

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.04 Health, Education and Self-Help Housing in Low-Income Colonias in the Border and in Mexico
This panel presents original papers that explores different "cuts" on the opportunities and constraints of residence in self-built colonias and other low income environments in the border and in Mexico. Specifically the authors discuss intersections between health (water borne diseases) and model subdivisions (MSRs) that superseded colonias in Texas; the dynamics an vulnerabilities associated with new developer practices in MSRs since the late 1990s; the education, employment trajectories and wage earning outcomes of colonia school children; the greenhouse gas emissions associated with residence and transportation needs of living in peripheral or peri-urban low income housing; and (for profit) CEMEX's role in supporting self-building construction practices in Mexico.

Subdivision Regulation and the Incidence of Waterborne Illnesses in Texas Border Counties
Noah D. Durst, University of Texas at Austin

Employment and Wage Outcomes of Students From Texas Border Colonias and Model Subdivisions
Carlos Olmedo, University of Texas at Austin

Market-­Oriented Self-­Help Housing Provision: The Case of Cemex, Mexico
Bara Safarova, Texas A&M University

Keep Residents in the City: Urban Densification to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Mexico City’s Housing Sector
Ariadna Reyes-Sanchez, University of Texas at Austin

Model Subdivisions: The New Face of Developer Lot Sales for Low-Income Colonia Type Housing in Texas
Peter M. Ward, University of Texas at Austin

Speakers
avatar for Carlos Olmedo, University of Texas at Austin

Carlos Olmedo, University of Texas at Austin

University of Texas at Austin (LBJ School of Public Affairs)
My dissertation research investigates the intersection between poverty, human capital and low income housing along the Texas-Mexico border.
ND

Noah D Durst

LBJ School of Public Affairs, Univesrity of Texas at Austin
avatar for Ariadna Itzel Reyes Sanchez

Ariadna Itzel Reyes Sanchez

Phd Student in Community and Regional Planning, University of Texas at Austin
avatar for Peter Ward

Peter Ward

C.B Smith Sr. Centennial Chair in US-Mexico Relations, University of Texas-Ausitin

Sponsors
Moderators
avatar for Peter Ward

Peter Ward

C.B Smith Sr. Centennial Chair in US-Mexico Relations, University of Texas-Ausitin

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua Salon F

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.05 Trends in U.S. Public Housing Policy
In its 1992 report the National Commission on Severely Distressed Public Housing declared that distressed public housing in the United States was a “national disgrace.” Moreover, the Commission argued that severely distressed public housing was not just a matter of fixing the physical condition of buildings, but also addressing the “human condition of residents.” Since the Commission issued its report sweeping changes to federal policy have occurred that are, arguably, intended to improve the livelihoods of low-income households and the physical condition of housing developments. However, these policy changes have occurred at the same time that federal funding for public housing has been declining in real, inflation-adjust dollars. Sequestration of the federal budget, which began in 2013, has further stressed the finances of PHAs because it has led to additional cuts in federal funding. Given a lack of adequate public funds and capital backlog needs that exceed $26 billion, how can PHAs repair existing housing and preserve affordable housing? To explore this topic, this panel focuses on three relevant federal policies: HOPE VI, the Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD), and Moving to Work (MTW).

RAD and the Future of Public Housing in the United States
Alex Schwartz, The New School

Totally RAD: The Rental Assistance Demonstration and the New Public Housing Finance
Matthew Gebhardt, Portland State University

After the Projects: The Surprising Variety of HOPE VI Public Housing Transformation in the United States
Lawrence Vale, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Shomon Shamsuddin, Tufts University

Deregulation of Public Housing Policy: Propositions for Policy Expansion of HUD's Moving to Work Demonstration
Amanda Kass, University of Illinois at Chicago; Amy Khare, The University of Chicago

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Kass, University of Illinois at Chicago

Amanda Kass, University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois at Chicago
MG

Matthew Gebhardt

Portland State University
avatar for Alex Schwartz,The New School

Alex Schwartz,The New School

Professor, The New School
avatar for Lawrence J. Vale

Lawrence J. Vale

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Moderators
avatar for Amanda Kass, University of Illinois at Chicago

Amanda Kass, University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois at Chicago

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Indigo 206

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.07 More Than Housing: Welfare States and Service Delivery


“Political Capital as a Precursor to Resident Coproduction Efforts"
Gary Anderson, University of North Carolina at Pembroke

The Search for Clarity: Exploring the Variation in Housing First Programs
Patricia Chen, The University of Texas at Dallas

Increasing the Role of Social Housing to Tackle Poverty
Jennifer Doyle, Trafford Housing Trust; Julian Westwood, Trafford Housing Trust

The Scale of Urban Structure and Access to Social Welfare and Education From an Integration Perspective in Stockholm, Sweden
Kati Kadarik, Uppsala University; John Östh, Uppsala University

Pathways to Self-Sufficiency: Lessons from Atlanta's MTW Demonstration
Michael Rich, Emory University; Moshe Haspel, Emory University; Yuk Fai Cheong, Emory University; Elizabeth Griffiths, Rutgers University; Michael Leo Owens, Emory University; Lance Waller, Emory University

Speakers
PC

Patricia Chen, The University of Texas at Dallas

Doctoral Candidate, The University of Texas at Dallas
JD

Jennifer Doyle

Customer Intelligence Officer, Trafford Housing Trust
KK

Kati Kadarik

Uppsala University, Institute for Housing and Urban Research
GA

Gary Anderson, University of North Carolina at Pembroke

University of North Carolina at Pembroke
MR

Michael Rich

Emory University

Moderators
MR

Michael Rich

Emory University

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Indigo 204B

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.08 Institutional and Spatial Patterns in Diversifying Contexts
Moderator:  Ali Modarres, University of Washington Tacoma

Landscapes of Social and Cultural Diversity: Formations, Tensions and Perception in Three Globalizing Cities of Immigration

Felicity Chan, University of Southern California

Immigrant Cities: Planning in the Absence of the State
Ali Modarres, University of Washington Tacoma

Is Diversity in the Cities of Europe Really Increasing? Increase vs. Recognition of Diversity
Ifigenia Evlampia Kokkali, Politecnico di Milano

Nonprofit Executive Succession Planning in Germany and India

Karl Besel, Indiana University; Muthusami Kumaran, University of Florida

Speakers
KB

Karl Besel

Indiana University
FC

Felicity Chan

University of Southern California
AM

Ali Modarres

Director, Urban Studies, University of Washington Tacoma

Moderators
AM

Ali Modarres

Director, Urban Studies, University of Washington Tacoma

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua 311B

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.10 Health Outcomes in Urban Neighborhood Contexts

“I Was Scared Over There” - Family Well-being After Relocation from a Distressed Public Housing Development
Kirstin Frescoln, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Mai Nguyen, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Michael Webb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;  William Rohe, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Health Impact Assessment (HIA) of the Transformation Plan for a HUD Designated Choice Neighborhood in Albany, Georgia
Sarah M. Smith, Georgia Institute of Technology; Catherine L. Ross, Georgia Institute of Technology/CQGRD

Searching for Silver Linings: Does Segregation Offset Minority Patient Discrimination From Healthcare Providers?
Joseph Gibbons, San Diego State University; Tse-Chuan Yang, University at Albany


Speakers
avatar for Kirstin Frescoln

Kirstin Frescoln

PhD Candidate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
My work focuses on community engagement to improve health and well-being for vulnerable populations. My current work is focused in public housing. I am the former North Carolina State Drug Treatment Court Manager and continue to provide national consultation on local, state, and... Read More →
JG

Joseph Gibbons

San Diego State University
SM

Sarah M. Smith

Georgia Institute of Technology

Moderators
JG

Joseph Gibbons

San Diego State University

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua 309

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.11 Cities and Climate Change: The Big Questions, Current Research, and Theoretical Contributions to Urban Studies (PART I)
Climate change is increasingly shaping the social, political, and economic contexts of cities. International and national leaders view cities as climate change leaders. A recent summit held in Los Angeles, and attended by the lead climate change negotiators for the U.S. and China, highlighted the role for cities in implementing climate change policies and providing support for each country’s initiatives. Indeed, each year more cities pledge to dramatically reduce their GHG emissions despite the increasingly apparent political and financial obstacles to implementation. Cities are also where adaptation strategies – efforts to adjust social and physical systems to the new conditions generated by climate change – are being piloted. Increased temperatures, changes in precipitation, and rising sea levels are beginning to inform decisions about infrastructure investment, housing, and service delivery. This organized, two-panel session highlights the important questions these developments raise for urban studies and the research programs that are tackling them. The first panel focuses on mitigation, or the reduction of GHG emissions in cities. What role do city governments play? How do transnational networks and multiple sources of capacity shape local outcomes? Papers in this panel explore these questions using the experiences of cities in the U.S., Canada, and Germany. The second panel focuses on adaptation, examining the emergence of adaptation actions and policies in cities and evaluating their implications for urban residents. How and when do cities decide to adapt? How do these decisions interact with existing urban political and social stratifications? Panel participants use the experiences of cities in the U.S. and the Global South with climate change adaptation to explore these questions. In each panel we will devote time to discussing the broader theoretical contributions that come from better understanding the relationship between cities and climate change.

Size and Sustainability: Investigating Multi-Level Drivers of Local Government Climate Change Action
George Homsy, State University of New York, Binghamton

Trans-Local Action and Local Innovations in Climate Change Policy. A Comparative Analysis of German Major Cities
Jörg Kemmerzell, Technical University Darmstadt

The Steering Ability of City Governments: Reducing GHG Emissions From Energy Generation
Sara Hughes, University of Toronto

Mental Models and the Robustness of Institutions: Lessons for Mitigation and Adaption Strategies at the Regional Government Level
Michail Fragkias, Boise State University; Susan Mason, Boise State University

Speakers
avatar for George C. Homsy

George C. Homsy

Assistant Professor, State University of New York, Binghamton
Local government and neighborhood level sustainability efforts
SH

Sara Hughes

University of Toronto
avatar for Jörg Kemmerzell

Jörg Kemmerzell

Institute of Political Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt
Energy transition, energy and climate governance, multilevel governance, German municipalities
SM

Susan Mason

Boise State University

Moderators
SH

Sara Hughes

University of Toronto

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua 307

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.13 Issues in Transportation Equity
This panel explores topics related to transportation research, with a special emphasis on issues of transportation equity. Papers include qualitative work exploring influences on travel demand and behavior; spatial analysis that investigates the social distribution of transit-based access to destinations, and varying impact of transportation burdens and infrastructure shortcomings on urban populations.

Rethinking Supply and Demand in Public Transit Accessibility Studies
Alex Karner, Georgia Institute of Technology; Tim Welch, Georgia Institute of Technology

Can I Get a Ride? Exploring the Role of Social Networks in Transportation
Bri Gauger, University of Michigan; Joe Grengs, University of Michigan;
Alexandra Murphy, University of Michigan; Alix Gould-Werth, University of Michigan

Exploring Social Patterns of Transit-Based Access to Opportunities
Liz Williams, Northeastern University

Transportation Diversity and Neighborhood-Level Inequality in New York’s Experience of Hurricane Sandy
Gordon Douglas, New York University

Speakers
GD

Gordon Douglas

New York University
avatar for Alex Karner

Alex Karner

Assistant professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
LW

Liz Williams

Northeastern University

Moderators
avatar for Russell Lopez

Russell Lopez

Northeastern University

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua 311A

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.15 'Choice' in Education Consumption and Decision Making


Camden Perspectives on Imposed Renaissance Charters
Keith Benson, Rutgers University; Camden City School District

Spatial Analysis of Educational and Housing Opportunities of a Managed School Choice System
Craig Hochbein, Lehigh University; Anne Marie FitzGerald, Duquesne University

Choosing Local Public Schools: Understanding Parent Decisions in Philadelphia’s Gentrifying (and Gentrified) Neighborhoods
Katharine Nelson, Rutgers University

Making or Buying Research: Using Transaction Cost Economics to Understand Decision Making in Public School Districts
Jennifer Watling Neal, Michigan State University; Zachary Neal, Michigan State University; Kristen Mills, Michigan State University; Jennifer Lawlor, Michigan State University

Speakers
CH

Craig Hochbein

Lehigh University
JW

Jennifer Watling Neal

Michigan State University
avatar for Keith Benson, Rutgers University

Keith Benson, Rutgers University

President, Camden Education Association

Moderators
CH

Craig Hochbein

Lehigh University

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua 305

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.17 New Modes of Participation? From Urban Unrest to Social Pacification


Police Communication in an Era of Body-Cams: Management Techniques as Transparency Optics
Nicholas Belongie, University at Buffalo, State University of New York

Las Vegas/Miami: Cities of Illusion and the Urban Environments of Mediated Neoliberalism
Moses Shumow, Florida International University; Christopher Harris, Nevada State College

Using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) for Integrative and Sustainable Communication in Collaborative Governance: Anyang Stream Restoration Case From South Korea
Changyu Hong, Portland State University

Speakers
avatar for Nicholas Belongie, University at Buffalo

Nicholas Belongie, University at Buffalo

Doctoral Student Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Urban Studies, University at Buffalo, State University of New York
avatar for Chang-yu Hong

Chang-yu Hong

Portland State University
Chang-Yu Hong has been attending the Ph.D. program of Urban Studies at PSU in order to understand urban water resource planning and civic participatory approaches to natural resource management. Additionally, while previously working for K-water he participated in water resource... Read More →
MS

Moses Shumow, Florida International University

Florida International University

Moderators
MS

Moses Shumow, Florida International University

Florida International University

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua 314

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.18 Taking a Closer Look at Citizen Attitudes and Participation In Mexico City and Chicago


Formal –vs- Informal Participatory Mechanisms, Which Way to Go?
Arturo Flores, Instituto Electoral del Distrito Federal

How to Study Learning in Democratic Activity Across Time and Space by Analyzing Discourse
José W. Meléndez, University of Illinois, Chicago



Speakers
AF

Arturo Flores, Instituto Electoral del Distrito Federal

Instituto Electoral del Distrito Federal
avatar for Jose W. Melendez

Jose W. Melendez

Postdoc in Teaching and Mentoring, University of Illinois, Chicago
José W. Meléndez received his doctorate from the Learning Sciences program at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), with a co-discipline in Urban Planning and Policy. His research focuses on the interrelation between the environment, participants, and language and how each... Read More →

Moderators
AF

Arturo Flores, Instituto Electoral del Distrito Federal

Instituto Electoral del Distrito Federal

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua Salon D

1:30pm PDT

TH1.30.19 Reconfiguring Cultures: Strategies to Empower Citizens


Tracing the Temporary: Actor-Network Theory (ANT) Case Studies in Four Comparative Euro-American Contexts
Robin Chang, Technical University of Dortmund

Planning Culture Research: Lessons Learned from a Practice Theory Perspective
Andreas Putlitz, Technical University of Dortmund, Germany

So What Exactly is Coproduction? Developing a Typology for More Systematic Research
Kelechi Uzochukwu, University of Baltimore

Digital Urbanities Among Urban and Digital Landscapes
Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Speakers
avatar for Robin Chang

Robin Chang

Research Associate, Technical University of Dortmund/EURA
Robin Chang works at the European Planning Cultures Department in the Spatial Planning Faculty of the Technical University of Dortmund as a Research Associate supporting research and seminars exploring Euro-American planning cultures and land use management practices. Other research... Read More →
avatar for Andreas Putlitz

Andreas Putlitz

Research Assistant, Technical University of Dortmund, Germany
Andreas Putlitz earned his Masters degree in Urban and Regional Planning at the School of Spatial Planning at the University of Vienna, Austria. After collaborating in scientific and consulting projects in France and Germany, he is now a third year Ph.D. student and Research Assistant... Read More →
avatar for Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Sociology Coordinator, Kean University
Currently working at the intersection of urban development and climate change to address the forms in which populations and aid are governed in a forthcoming book about Hurricane Sandy and climate change that will also include alternatives and the proliferation of discourses on preparedness... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Sociology Coordinator, Kean University
Currently working at the intersection of urban development and climate change to address the forms in which populations and aid are governed in a forthcoming book about Hurricane Sandy and climate change that will also include alternatives and the proliferation of discourses on preparedness... Read More →

Thursday March 17, 2016 1:30pm - 2:55pm PDT
Aqua 313

2:55pm PDT

Thursday - Coffee Break
Thursday March 17, 2016 2:55pm - 3:15pm PDT
Indigo West Foyer

3:14pm PDT

Thursday - Concurrent Sessions
Thursday March 17, 2016 3:14pm - 4:40pm PDT
See session listing
  Panels

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.00 Activist Scholar Award Recipient Colloquy on Promoting Affordable Housing Through Research and Action
The 2016 recipient of the UAA-SAGE Marilyn J. Gittell Activist Scholar Award is Nico Calavita, Professor Emeritus, SanDiego State University.  Dr. Calavita will discuss his efforts over the years to advance affordable housing in San Diego, the State of California, and urban communities across the globe.  Comments will be offered by Ken Grimes, Executive Director of the City Heights Community Development Corporation,  and Stephen Russell, Executive DIrector of the San Diego Housing Federation.

Ken Grimes is a former student of Dr. Calavita, who help lead the passage of the San Diego Housing Trust Fund and inclusionary housing legislation. Mr. Grimes holds a Masters in City Planning from San Diego State University and and undergraduate degree in sociology from the University of Bath, England.  Stephen Russell has a 20-year history working in community and economic development in the Mid-City region of San Diego. He has been President of the City Heights Community Development Corporation. Prior to joining the San Diego Housing Federation as its Executive Director, Stephen was a member of the firm Platt/Whitelaw Architects, Inc., a firm specializing in sustainable design. Mr. Russell is a 2005 graduate of the NewSchool of Architecture & Design.

Speakers
NC

Nico Calavita

San Diego State University
2016 Activist Scholar Awardee; Professor Emeritus, San Diego State University


Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua Salon E

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.09 Understanding Jerusalem's Conflict: A Look at Jerusalem: The Spatial Politics of a Divided Metropolis by Anne B. Shlay and Gillad Rosen, 2015, Polity
This session will discuss the recent book: Jerusalem: The spatial politics of a divided city (Polity, 2015) by Anne B. Shlay and Gillad Rosen. The book explores the political and social struggles around control over space and development in Jerusalem, one of the world’s most important cities and the location of intense struggle. This panel will critically evaluate the contributions of the book. Is the book’s empirical focus on demystifying Jerusalem’s complexity useful in aiding the resolution of entrenched conflict? Does the book help to develop methods for enhancing the peace process? Ultimately, what does this book say about the future of this divided city and the possibility for a negotiated resolution?

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Garshick Kleit

Rachel Garshick Kleit

Professor, Ohio State University
I'm a researcher and urban planner interested in poverty reduction and the social impacts of housing on the lives of the poor.
ZN

Zachary Neal

Michigan State University
EV

Elena Vesselinov

Queens College/CUNY

Moderators
AB

Anne B. Shlay

Georgia State University

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua Salon C

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.10 The Promise of Two-Generation Strategies: Lessons From the Field
There is increasing interest from policymakers, practitioners, and scholars on the potential for two-generation service models for breaking the cycle of intergenerational poverty. Traditionally, most social service programs focus either on low-income children, e.g. Head Start or school-based interventions, or adults, e.g. employment or training interventions. But decades of research have shown that the results of these single-focus interventions are generally modest and that too many families remain in deep poverty and stuck in chronically disadvantaged, racially segregated and chronically violent communities (Sampson 2012, Sharkey 2013). Two-generation models are designed to address the multidimensional aspects of family poverty and seek to intentionally integrate services for children with services for their parents with the goal of “moving the needle” in longer and better ways for both. While there is a resurgence of interest in two-generation models, there is little evidence about what it takes to implement an effective program, or what such a model looks like on the ground. In particular, we need to know more about what true service integration looks like, why and how it matters for families, and the critical role of the case managers or coaches in ensuring that services are appropriate and mutually-reinforcing. This session will explore these issues drawing on the research findings on the early implementation experiences of three very different two-generation models: The Annie E. Casey Foundation's Family Economic Success-Early Childhood (FES-EC) and Family-Centered Community Change (FCCC) initiatives; The Urban Institute's Housing Opportunities and Services Together (HOST) Demonstration, and The United Way of Santa Fe County. Discussants will offer lessons for the field, drawing on the knowledge and experience of Aspen’s Ascend Initiative, which has taken the lead in promoting two-generation strategies.

Speakers
MB

Mary Bogle

Urban Institute
RM

Rosa Maria Castaneda

Annie E. Casey Foundation
KF

Katherine Freeman

President/CEO, United Way of Santa Fe County
MS

Marjorie Sims

Ascend at The Aspen Institute

Moderators
MS

Marjorie Sims

Ascend at The Aspen Institute

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua 313

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.20 Re-Thinking Justice in the City in the Wake of Ferguson and Baltimore
The protests that erupted (and are still erupting) in the wake of recent instances of policy brutality and misconduct in Ferguson and Baltimore were motivated by a deep sense of injustice. Putting these protests in context, what do they mean for urban politics and policy? Are they essentially a replay of the protests of the Sixties? Did the victories of the civil rights movement make any difference? Is racism as bad as ever? Or are there new spatial and economic inequalities driving events today? How can leaders respond to these movements? Are the new movements for urban justice unique to the United States or is this a global movement? The colloquy includes a speaker from St. Louis, as well as speakers who have studied social movements around the United States and in other countries.

Speakers
CS

Cathy Schneider

American University
TS

Todd Swanstrom

Professor in Community Collaboration and Public Po, University of Missouri-St. Louis

Moderators
TS

Todd Swanstrom

Professor in Community Collaboration and Public Po, University of Missouri-St. Louis

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Indigo Ballroom B

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.01 Metropolitan Governance: Global Trajectories, Dynamics and Challenges


Change of growth management policy in Seoul Metropolitan Area, South Korea
Deok Hun Cho, Sejong Cyber Unversity; Roger W. Caves, San Diego State University

The State and City in Australian Federalism: Dateline Sydney Global City
Bligh Grant, University of Technology Sydney

Urban Enclaves and Special Urban Zones: The Postcolonial Drive of Chinese Urbanization
Samuel Y. Liang, Utah Valley University

Ready or Not: The Inevitability of Another Casino in Sydney
Kane Pham, University of Technology Sydney

What Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Leung Could Learn From Seoul’s Mayor Park: Responsive Politics in Global Cities Within Authoritarian Regimes
Jill Tao, Incheon National University

Speakers
DH

Deok Hun Cho

SEJONG CYBER UNIVERSITY
avatar for Samuel Y. Liang

Samuel Y. Liang

Associate Professor, Utah Valley University
From 1994 to 2011 I taught architectural history and Chinese art and culture in Guangzhou University (China), University of Manchester (UK), and MIT (USA). I joined Utah Valley University (USA) in 2011 and am now Associate Professor of Humanities and Chinese Studies. I published... Read More →
avatar for Kane Pham

Kane Pham

Research Candidate, University of Technology Sydney
My work considers the intersectionality of public space conflating myriad overlays of conflict and hegemony from democracy, globalisation, privatisation, rights of use and design determinism, identifying new ways to understand how to theorise and contribute to the construction of... Read More →
avatar for Bligh Grant, University of Technology Sydney

Bligh Grant, University of Technology Sydney

Associate Professor, University of Technology Sydney
I am a political scientist specialising in local government studies, particularly in Australia but also in international comparative perspective. Australia-U.S.-Canada comparative material has waned in recent years and us coming to UAA is to establish links in North America. My co-authored... Read More →
avatar for Jill Tao, Incheon National University

Jill Tao, Incheon National University

Associate Professor, Incheon National University
Mayors in East Asia, how to measure Confucian norms in local government, global bureaucrats and environmental issues.

Sponsors
Moderators
avatar for Jill Tao, Incheon National University

Jill Tao, Incheon National University

Associate Professor, Incheon National University
Mayors in East Asia, how to measure Confucian norms in local government, global bureaucrats and environmental issues.

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Indigo 202A

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.02 Spatial Mismatch, Employment and Commuting of Migrant Workers in China


Inequality of Earnings or Inequality of Return to Education? Regional Variation of Determinants on Earnings Inequality Between Chinese Rural-Urban Migrants and Rural Residents
Hao Jia, University of Minnesota; Chen Zhang, University of Minnesota

The Social Implications of Home-Work Separation: Investigating the Links of Commuting and Neighborhood Social Capital of Low-Income Residents in Beijing, China
Zhilin Liu, Tsinghua University; Yan Zhang, The Institute of Beijing Studies, Beijing Union University

The Segmentation of Urban Housing and Labor Markets in China: The Case of Shanghai
Cathy Liu, Georgia State University; Huiping Li, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics; Jie Chen, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics

Understanding Transportation for Migrant Workers in Urban China – An Examination of Six Major Chinese Cities
Jenny Hsing-I Liu, Portland State University; Yiping Fang, Portland State University; Zhanxin Zhang, The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

Spatial Deprivation of Urban Public Services in Migrant Communities Under the Context of Rapidly Urbanizing China: A Case of Shanghai
Li Tian, Tongji University; Wei Ouyang, Renmin University of China; Boyi Wang, Tongji University

Speakers
HJ

Hao Jia

Humphrey School of Public Affairs, UMN
avatar for Cathy Liu

Cathy Liu

Associate Professor, Georgia State University
LT

Li Tian

Tongji university, Shanghai, China
ZL

Zhilin Liu, Tsinghua University

Associate Prfessor, Tsinghua University
avatar for Jenny Hsing-I Liu, Portland State University

Jenny Hsing-I Liu, Portland State University

Assistant Professor, Portland State University
Economics, transportation, environment, public policy, carbon tax

Sponsors
Moderators
avatar for Cathy Liu

Cathy Liu

Associate Professor, Georgia State University

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Indigo 202B

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.04 Pathways to Regional Economic Resilience
Understanding why some regions are more resilient than others in the face of economic adversity remains a top priority for urban scholars and practitioners. Connections between economic geography, technology, labor markets, educational attainment, hierarchy, and history can confer lasting regional competitive advantage and competitive disadvantage. While innovation and creativity are vital components of the resilience equation, economic vitality is also closely tied to industry cycles, regional portfolios of traded-sector industries, and occupational structure. This session will consist of papers examining variation in the economic resilience of U.S. metropolitan regions from industrial-, occupational-, and skills-based perspectives.

The Resilience of U.S Metropolitan Economies During the Great Recession
Edward Hill, Ohio State University; Hal Wolman, George Washington Institute of Public Policy; Kelly Kinahan, Cleveland State University

Identifying Opportunity Occupations in the Largest U.S. Metropolitan Regions
Kyle Fee, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland

Are Policymakers Overestimating the Importance of STEM?
Fran Stewart, Cleveland State University



Speakers
KF

Kyle Fee

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland
FS

Fran Stewart

Cleveland State University

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua Salon A/B

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.05 Race, Opportunity, and Gentrification: The Role of Urban Politics and Communities
From colonial planning to contemporary urban gentrification, race and class power and privilege have long shaped the urban landscape and processes of urban change. In this session, we look back at the early roots of the planning profession and move through to the present politics of urban redevelopment and renewal to investigate the ways in which race and class have been central to discourses over and the actual processes of neighborhood change. We also look forward to ask how paying attention to the systems and structures that have come to bind race, class, and neighborhood opportunity together also holds keys to their undoing. Our papers draw from diverse urban geographies and communities—from neighborhoods comprised largely of low-income Latino immigrants in California and African Americans in inner city Baltimore, to diverse neighborhoods in New York and postcolonial Hong Kong. In all these places we find a struggle over the rights of disadvantaged groups to remain in place, increase access to opportunities, and be included among the beneficiaries of neighborhood change. Our primary questions settle on the role of urban politics and policy in shaping certain narratives about the city and neighborhoods that enable processes of displacement and the roles of communities in fighting back for a place at the table. Our papers contemplate the possibilities for inclusive and equitable urban change, when urban planners and policy makers better listen to, make room for, and empower more voices in the processes that shape and reshape cities.

Opportunity for Whom? The Diverse Definitions of Neighborhood Opportunity in Baltimore
Willow Lung-Amam, University of Maryland, College Park; Eli Knaap, University of Maryland, College Park; Casey Dawkins, University of Maryland, College Park; Gerrit-Jan Knaap, University of Maryland, College Park

Gentrification and the Urban Mosaic: Long-Term Effects on Neighborhood Structure
Stacey Sutton, University of Illinois, Chicago

Mobility and the Everyday Day Use of Space in a Gentrifying Santa Ana, California
Carolina Sarmiento, University of Wisconsin, Madison; J. Revel Sims, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Bringing Back Old North Dayton: Gentrification Without Displacement?
Stacy Harwood, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Gentrification and Residential Displacement Patterns in Chicago’s Public Housing Transformation
Andrew J. Greenlee, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Speakers
avatar for Willow Lung-Amam, University of Maryland College Park

Willow Lung-Amam, University of Maryland College Park

Director of Community Development, National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education
Willow Lung-Amam, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor in the Urban Studies and Planning Program and Director of Community Development at the National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her scholarship focuses on the link between social... Read More →

Moderators
GK

Gerrit-Jan Knapp

University of Maryland, College Park

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Indigo 204A

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.06 Community Land Trusts: Impacts on Affordable Housing and Neighborhood Inequality


Quantifying the Effect of Subsidy Retention Versus Subsidy Recapture in the Community Land Trust Model
Sarah Jones, University of Texas at San Antonio; Rebecca Walter, University of Texas at San Antonio; Carla Flink, University of Texas at San Antonio

The Better Tool for Community Sustainability: Land Banks or Community Land Trust in Third Ward, Houston, Texas
Jeffrey Lowe, Texas Southern University; Lester King, Rice University

Interrupting Inequality: CLTs as an Intervening Force in the Social and Economic Reproduction of Disadvantage
Kristen Hackett, City University of New York; Susan Saegert, City University of New York; Erit Maor, City University of New York

Neighborhood Governance Through an Urban Community Land Trust
Olivia Williams, Florida State University

Speakers
KH

Kristen Hackett

City University of New York
avatar for Sarah Jones

Sarah Jones

University of Texas at San Antonio
I am a graduate student in the Urban and Regional Planning program at the University of Texas at San Antonio. I currently work as a Supportive Service Specialist for the families of Wheatley Courts, a public housing complex that received a Choice Neighborhoods grant to renovate the... Read More →
JL

Jeffrey Lowe

Texas Southern University
OW

Olivia Williams

Florida State University

Moderators
JL

Jeffrey Lowe

Texas Southern University

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Indigo 204B

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.07 Rethinking Rental Housing Outcomes


Reigning in the Sharing Economy? Challenges to Regulating Short-Term Rentals in New Orleans, Louisiana
Marla Nelson, University of New Orleans; Renia Ehrenfeucht, University of New Mexico

Counselors or Craigslist? Relationships Between Housing Search Resources and Voucher Holders’ Neighborhood Outcomes
Michael Webb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; William Rohe, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Kirstin Frescoln, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Examining the Potential Impacts of a Federal Renter’s Tax Credit
Emily Warren, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Speakers
EW

Emily Warren

University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Michael Webb

Michael Webb

Research Associate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Neighborhood revitalization, gentrification, community economic development, urban governance

Moderators
avatar for Michael Webb

Michael Webb

Research Associate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Neighborhood revitalization, gentrification, community economic development, urban governance

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Indigo 206

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.08 Understanding the Evolution of Policies and Perspectives on 'Urban'


Doomed From the Start: Public Housing & the Housing Shortage After WII
Prentiss Dantzler, Colorado College

Late 19th and Early 20th Century Sources of Metropolitan Fragmentation
David Elesh, Temple University

The Moral Foundations of Anti-Urbanism: Assessing the Basis of Opposition to City Living
Paul Lewis, Arizona State University

Political Authority and the Urban Policy Ecology: Social Policy Centralization and Urban Reform in Toronto
Jack Lucas, University of Calgary



Speakers
PD

Prentiss Dantzler

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Colorado College
PG

Paul G Lewis

Arizona State University

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua 311B

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.11 Socio-Economic Factors in Education Outcomes


Contextualizing School Discipline: How Cultural Misunderstandings Shape School Discipline in an Urban High School
Olivia Marcucci, Washington University in St. Louis; Rowhea Elmesky, Washington University in St. Louis

Close to Home: The Geography of College Knowledge in Urban Schools
Shomon Shamsuddin, Tufts University

Parental Involvement and Low SES Families
Dina C. Walker-DeVose, Georgia Southern University; Jocelyn Taliaferro, North Carolina State University

Speakers
OM

Olivia Marcucci

Washington University in St. Louis
avatar for Jocelyn Taliaferro

Jocelyn Taliaferro

Associate Professor & Director of The Graduate Program, North Carolina State University
If you only look at what is, you might never attain what could be!

Moderators
avatar for Jocelyn Taliaferro

Jocelyn Taliaferro

Associate Professor & Director of The Graduate Program, North Carolina State University
If you only look at what is, you might never attain what could be!

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua 305

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.12 Health and the Effects of Built Environments


Open Heat Vulnerability Mapper: Exploring the Intersection of Vulnerability and Exposure to Extreme Heat Events
Bev Wilson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Arnab Chakraborty, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Elizabeth Bastian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Restoring Occupants’ Attention and Their Emotional Experience Through the Redesign of Public Spaces
Peijia Zha, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; Te-Sheng Huang, Feng Chia University; Li-Shin Chang, Feng Chia University

A Longitudinal Analysis of the Relationship Between Perceived Neighborhood Safety and Child Health Outcomes
Emily Zimmerman, Virginia Commonwealth University; Nancy Fleischer, University of Michigan

Speakers
BW

Bev Wilson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
PZ

Peijia Zha

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
EZ

Emily Zimmerman

Virginia Commonwealth University

Moderators
BW

Bev Wilson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua 309

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.13 Cities and Climate Change: The Big Questions, Current Research, and Theoretical Contributions to Urban Studies (PART II)
Climate change is increasingly shaping the social, political, and economic contexts of cities. International and national leaders view cities as climate change leaders. A recent summit held in Los Angeles, and attended by the lead climate change negotiators for the U.S. and China, highlighted the role for cities in implementing climate change policies and providing support for each country’s initiatives. Indeed, each year more cities pledge to dramatically reduce their GHG emissions despite the increasingly apparent political and financial obstacles to implementation. Cities are also where adaptation strategies – efforts to adjust social and physical systems to the new conditions generated by climate change – are being piloted. Increased temperatures, changes in precipitation, and rising sea levels are beginning to inform decisions about infrastructure investment, housing, and service delivery. This organized, two-panel session highlights the important questions these developments raise for urban studies and the research programs that are tackling them. The first panel focuses on mitigation, or the reduction of GHG emissions in cities. What role do city governments play? How do transnational networks and multiple sources of capacity shape local outcomes? Papers in this panel explore these questions using the experiences of cities in the U.S., Canada, and Germany. The second panel focuses on adaptation, examining the emergence of adaptation actions and policies in cities and evaluating their implications for urban residents. How and when do cities decide to adapt? How do these decisions interact with existing urban political and social stratifications? Panel participants use the experiences of cities in the U.S. and the Global South with climate change adaptation to explore these questions. In each panel we will devote time to discussing the broader theoretical contributions that come from better understanding the relationship between cities and climate change.

Exploring the Commitment to Act on Climate Change Adaptation in Baltimore
Andrea Sarzynski, University of Delaware

Anticipating Urban Adaptation: Responsibility, Politics, Autonomy, and the Emergence of Adaptation
Scott Kalafatis, University of Michigan

Urban Climate Adaptation and the Politics of Socio-Spatial (In)Justice in the Global South
Eric Chu, University of Amsterdam

Speakers
EC

Eric Chu

Assistant Professor of Urban Studies, University of Amsterdam
SK

Scott Kalafatis

University of Michigan, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
AS

Andrea Sarzynski

University of Delaware

Moderators
AS

Andrea Sarzynski

University of Delaware

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua 307

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.15 An Overview of International Transport Issues

Access to Public Transportation in Canadian Cities, Modal Choice, and Subjective Outcomes
William Michelson, University of Toronto

Fifty Years of Authoritarian High Modernist Planning in Utopian Singapore
Craig Townsend, Concordia University

Socio-Economic Benefits of Road Development: Migrants and Original Residents in Danang, Vietnam
Sehyung Won, Seoul National University; Youngmee Jeon, Seoul National University; Saehoon Kim, Seoul National University

Speakers
avatar for William Michelson

William Michelson

S.D. Clark Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, University of Toronto
Urban Sociologist. Particular interests in human behavior within urban settings and time-use documentation.
avatar for Craig Townsend

Craig Townsend

Associate Professor, Concordia University
SW

Sehyung Won

Seoul National University

Moderators
avatar for William Michelson

William Michelson

S.D. Clark Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, University of Toronto
Urban Sociologist. Particular interests in human behavior within urban settings and time-use documentation.

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua 310B

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.16 Information and the Global Governance Process


City Government Use of Social Media: Promote, Reach Out, and Maybe Engage…But Certainly Post Images
Ann Bowman, Texas A&M University; Domonic Bearfield, Texas A&M University

Representing Your City? Contrasting Public Employees and the General Public's Perceptions About Their Community

Josephine Gatti Schafer, Kansas State University

Mapping Small Cities in the Age of Big Data: Participatory GIS Approaches to Housing in Georgia
Jerry Shannon, University of Georgia; Kimberly Skobba, University of Georgia; Karen Tinsley, University of Georgia; Adenola Osinubi, University of Georgia





Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua Salon D

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.17 Pedestrians' Use of Urban Space



Crossing Streets Intersections in Old Age, With or Without RIsks? A Combined Exploration of Risk Perceptions and Walking Behaviours for Older Pedestrians

Sébastien Lord, University of Montréal; Marie-Soleil Cloutier, INRS-UCS

Urban Design and Route-Choice: Interaction Between Micro-Spatial Attributes of Street Segments and Pedestrian Spatial Navigation

Mohsen Ghiasi Ghorveh, North Carolina State University; Robin Moore, North Carolina State University

Pedestrian Urban Design: Linking Public Transport Ridership to Environmental Benefits
Brian P. Garcia, University College London

Speakers
avatar for Brian P Garcia

Brian P Garcia

University College London
MG

Mohsen Ghiasi Ghorveh

North Carolina State University
avatar for Sébastien Lord

Sébastien Lord

Assistant Professor, University of Montréal

Moderators
avatar for Jonathan Davies

Jonathan Davies

Director - Centre for Urban Research on Austerity, De Montfort University
I am Director of the Centre for Urban Research on Austerity at De Montfort University in Leicester, UK. See http://cura.our.dmu.ac.uk for further information about the Centre. I am a political sociologist, studying urban governance from a Gramscian point of view.I am about to enter... Read More →

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua 311A

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.18 Comparative Perspectives on Global Cities and the Circulation of Knowledge


Exporting the Best Practices: From Cheonggyecheon River Restoration Project in Seoul, South Korea to Hong River in Hanoi, Vietnam and L.A. River in Los Angeles, USA.
Sujee Jung, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Toronto and Sao Paulo: Cities and International Diplomacy
Richard Stren, University of Toronto

Inclusive Growth and the Urban Question: Some Lessons from Asia
Ravi Ghadge, Kennesaw State University

Speakers
RG

Ravi Ghadge

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Kennesaw State University
avatar for Sujee Jung

Sujee Jung

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua Salon F

3:15pm PDT

TH3.15.19 Theory and Politics of Ethnic Retail Districts
Ethnic retail districts are important social, economic, cultural, and political spaces embedded in nearly every major metropolitan area in North America and Western Europe. Although ethnic enclaves and immigrant specialty stores are nothing new, recent developments in transportation and communication technologies, shifting demographic profiles of immigrant elites, and growing popular interest in world market consumer culture is transforming the form, function, location, and significance of ethnic retail districts. This panel analyzes the theoretical and practical implications of these transformations by exploring ethnic shopping districts through the lenses of translocal mobility, suburban revitalization, urban branding, and business entrepreneurship. Presentations include data from Muslim Arab-American enclaves in the inner-ring suburbs of Detroit, Chinese and South Asian shopping centers in the distant suburbs of Toronto, comparative data from Vietnamese and South Asian wholesale centers in Berlin and Toronto, and Latino communities in Charlotte. Collectively, these presentations highlight the shifting politics of ethnic retail districts and their important theoretical implications for metropolitan environments.

Translocality and Ethnic Retailing in Arab Muslim Detroit
Kimberley Kinder, University of Michigan

Making Ethnic Retail Places in Ethnoburbs: Case Studies From the Greater Toronto Area (GTA)
Zhixi Zhuang, Ryerson University

Branding Ethnic Districts in Toronto and Berlin
Antonie Schmiz, Goethe-University Frankfurt

Immigrant Entrepreneurship and Community Development: A Case in Charlotte, NC
Qingfang Wang, University of California Riverside

Speakers
avatar for Antonie Schmiz

Antonie Schmiz

Goethe-University Frankfurt
ZZ

Zhixi Zhuang, Ryerson University

Associate Professor, Ryerson University, School of Urban & Regional Planning

Moderators

Thursday March 17, 2016 3:15pm - 4:40pm PDT
Aqua 314

4:45pm PDT

5:30pm PDT

6:00pm PDT

7:00pm PDT

Thursday - Dinner (on your own)
Thursday March 17, 2016 7:00pm - 8:00pm PDT
TBA
 
Friday, March 18
 

6:00am PDT

Cornell University Press (Discounts and more!)
Meet Sr. Editor Michael McGandy at the Cornell University Press tables and browse our titles. We're offering a 30% discount on purchases made at the conference and on our website with promo code UAA16, good until April 15. Visit our UAA web page or download our PDF book list for more information!

Follow Michael McGandy on Twitter @michaelmcgandy
Follow Cornell Press on Twitter @CornellPress
http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/


Friday March 18, 2016 6:00am - 6:15am PDT
Indigo Ballroom A/E

6:00am PDT

Fordham University Press (Discounts and more!)

Fordham University Press, leading publisher of books in the humanities and social sciences, established the regional imprint, Empire State Editions. It seeks to publish creatively interdisciplinary work on topics related to New York City, from the environment to infrastructure to transportation. Stop by our booth to meet Fredric Nachbaur, browse our tiles, and receive a 30% discount on purchases made at the conference.



Friday March 18, 2016 6:00am - 6:15am PDT
Indigo Ballroom A/E

6:00am PDT

Routledge (Discounts; Learn how to get published!)
Routledge is a leading publisher of books and journals in the fields of Planning, Housing and Urban Studies. Visit our booth to view our publications, receive a 20% discount on books and find out how to get published or contribute to our books and journal programme.


Friday March 18, 2016 6:00am - 6:15am PDT
Indigo Ballroom A/E

6:15am PDT

6:59am PDT

6:59am PDT

Friday - Book Exhibit
Exhibitors
AB

Association Book Exhibit (Debmark Bks., Inc.)

 A combined display of scholarly/professional titles from leading publishers. Free ordering catalog available at the booth.
avatar for Helen Bader Institute for Nonprofit Management

Helen Bader Institute for Nonprofit Management

Through pioneering educational programs, applied research, and active engagement with nonprofit organizations of all types and sizes, the Helen Bader Institute for Nonprofit Management (HBI) develops nonprofit leaders who change lives. HBI’s programs offer a healthy balance of theory... Read More →

Exhibitor Attendees
avatar for Fiona Counsell

Fiona Counsell

Managing Editor, Routledge | Taylor & Francis
Looking forward to UAA 2016! Delegates are most welcome to talk to me about publishing, particularly journal publishing. Happy to discuss getting published, the journal process, marketing your research and yourself, social media, digital media, Open Access and more.
avatar for Douglas Hildebrand

Douglas Hildebrand

Director & Publisher, University of Alberta Press
avatar for Bryce Lord

Bryce Lord

Helen Bader Institute for Nonprofit Management
avatar for Michael McGandy

Michael McGandy

Senior Editor, Cornell University Press
Michael McGandy acquires books in urban history with a focus on New York City and New York State. Follow Michael on Twitter @michaelmcgandy
avatar for Fredric Nachbaur

Fredric Nachbaur

Director, Fordham University Press
As publisher of the Polis: Fordham Series in Urban Studies, I am searching for authors in fields as diverse as American Studies, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Urban Studies and who can write for both academic and informed lay audiences. Our objective is... Read More →
avatar for Juliana Pitanguy

Juliana Pitanguy

Springer Publishing
My name is Juliana Pitanguy and I am Associate Editor at Springer in the Netherlands. I develop the urban studies and urban geography program, inviting interest in publications and encouraging participation.
NS

Nicole Solano

Senior Editor, Routledge | Taylor & Francis
I'm the senior editor for the planning and urban design list at Routledge. In particular, I'm looking for book projects that focus on issues of social justice and equity, affordable housing, service learning in planning and urban design, and cutting-edge research. I would welcome... Read More →
avatar for Kay Tancock

Kay Tancock

Publisher - Geography, Planning & Development, Elsevier Ltd.
Kay Tancock is a Publisher of Geography, Planning and Development journals at Elsevier in Oxford, UK. She manages a portfolio of 20 academic journals in this disciplinary field. Kay will be running a stand in the exhibitors' area, providing information on many aspects of publishing... Read More →


Friday March 18, 2016 6:59am - 6:00pm PDT
Indigo Ballroom E/F

6:59am PDT

7:00am PDT

7:15am PDT

FR7.15.01 Research and Publishing on Urban Asia
Speakers
avatar for Shenjing He

Shenjing He

The University of Hong Kong
avatar for Cathy Liu

Cathy Liu

Associate Professor, Georgia State University
XR

Xuefei Ren

Michigan State University
JS

James Spencer

Associate Dean, Clemson University
LY

Lin Ye, Sun Yat-sen University

Sun Yat-Sen University
avatar for Jun Wang

Jun Wang

Assistant Professor, City University of Hong Kong

Sponsors

Friday March 18, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

FR7.15.03 Rethinking the Meaning of Livable Communities: Academic Perspectives
This breakfast roundtable will present perspectives from a group of academics from across the US on the topic of livable communities. The development of such communities is becoming an important part of community development, urban design, policy planning and urban affairs. With the desire by urban scholars throughout N. America and Europe to move from communities that are often described as sterile and boring places to live, it is important to understand the factors that make communities livable. This roundtable will discuss what has gone wrong in many communities and will offer suggestions for making them more livable. Moreover, the discussion will focus on rethinking the meaning of livable communities.

Speakers
JB

Jane Brooks

University of New Orleans
RC

Roger Caves

San Diego State University
DP

David Perry

University of Illinois at Chicago
FW

Fritz Wagner

University of Washington


Friday March 18, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

FR7.15.05 Directing Urban Research Centers in a Time of Austerity
This session is designed to give the directors of urban research centers an opportunity to meet and to discuss questions of mutual concern.  We will start a discussion of the ways participants have responded to ongoing cutbacks in funding for urban research and then move on to other topics of interest.

Speakers

Friday March 18, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

FR7.15.06 Increasing Diversity Among University Faculty: What Can Be Done?

During this roundtable, participants will discuss ideas on what could be done to improve the representation of scholars from under-represented backgrounds in academia. There will be discussion of research on this topic as well as an opportunity for participants to share their own experiences and insights. Also, participants will learn about the New Connections program, which is a professional development program aimed at increasing the numbers of underrepresented scholars that conduct health related research.

Speakers
TB

Tia Burroughs

New Connections


Friday March 18, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

FR7.15.02 Fulbright Scholar Program Support for Urban Affairs
The Fulbright Scholar Program, sponsored by the United States Department of State, offers long and short grants supporting teaching and research opportunities across the globe. With awards in specific disciplines as well as more than 400 that allow application in any of a number of academic specializations, the Fulbright Core and Specialist Programs are an excellent venue for expanding individual and institutional horizons. Because Fulbright is inherently malleable, it suits virtually every traditional field and incorporates ever-developing cross-discipline permutations. There are Fulbright grantees in urban affairs, urban planning, public administration, human geography, anthropology, sociology, law, environmental science and sustainable development. This breakfast roundtable will present the various options open to scholars of urban affairs in more than 125 countries around the world. In its annual Core competition and its short-term, collaborative Specialist Program, Fulbright sends Americans abroad and, in addition, welcomes visiting scholars to U.S. campuses. Options for flex awards that can be taken over as long as three years provide options from timing that did not exist oly a few years ago. Postdoc and new faculty awards have expanded the programs reach to embrace one’s whole career. With the Urban Affairs Association meeting in March, 2016, the Fulbright Core Program’s annual competition will have just opened in February. Thus, this discussion will be about the latest and most current competition, giving attendees the opportunity to discuss Fulbright, generally, as well as be informed about what is offered for Academic Year 2017-2018. For scholars of urban affairs with a desire to create or extend their global reach, the breakfast roundtable will be an excellent venue for exploring the United States Government’s flagship international educational program.


Friday March 18, 2016 7:15am - 8:00am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

7:15am PDT

FR7.15.04 Urban Studies Undergraduate Honor Society
The purpose of this roundtable is to introduce to the wider UAA audience the recently approved UAA-sponsored undergraduate honor society slated to begin recruiting campus chapters in Fall 2016. The discussion will focus on the benefits of the honor society for students and campuses and the how-to of starting a chapter. The goal of the roundtable is to inform UAA members of the honor society and to excite them about setting up a chapter on their home campus. The intended audience is faculty members from colleges and universities with undergraduate urban studies/urban planning/urban affairs majors.

Speakers
avatar for Edith Barrett

Edith Barrett

Director, Urban and Community Studies, University of Connecticut


Friday March 18, 2016 7:15am - 8:15am PDT
Indigo Ballroom C/D

8:04am PDT

Friday - Concurrent Sessions
Friday March 18, 2016 8:04am - 9:30am PDT
See session listing
  Panels

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.01 Remembering David W. Bartelt, 1944-2015
We will remember and celebrate the life and work of David Bartelt, a respected scholar, teacher, mentor, and friend to many in the Urban Affairs Association.   David was well known for his contributions to scholarship on cities, particularly in the areas of housing policy, neighborhood development and regional and community indicators.  He was a co-director of the Metropolitan Philadelphia Indicators Project and a representative to the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership, headquartered at the Urban Institute.  All are welcome to attend and share their memories and thoughts of David.

Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh (Moderator)
Claudia Coulton, Case Western Reserve
David Elesh, Temple University
Barbara Ferman, Temple University
Dennis Keating, Cleveland State University
Leslie Martin, University of Mary Washington
Michael Rich, Emory University
Greg Squires, George Washington University
Carolyn Adams, Temple University

Speakers
CA

Carolyn Adams

Temple University
CC

Claudia Coulton

Case Western Reserve University
avatar for Barbara Ferman

Barbara Ferman

Professor, Temple University
Born and raised in Brooklyn (which is still the 4th largest city!), I had an early education about urban areas that was shaped by some very practical activities – turning empty lots into playgrounds, keeping the hand ball court for hours, dodging traffic, and learning the subway... Read More →
WD

William Dennis Keating

Emeritus Professor, Levin College of Urban Affairs, Cleveland State University
Housing and Community Development
avatar for Leslie Martin

Leslie Martin

University of Mary Washington
MR

Michael Rich

Emory University
GS

Gregory Squires

Professor of Sociology, George Washington University

Moderators
avatar for Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

University of Pittsburgh
Sabina Deitrick, PhD, is Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and Director of Urban and Regional Analysis program at the University Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR) at the University of Pittsburgh.  Her research focuses on issues... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua 311B

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.05 HUD’s New “Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing” (AFFH) Rule: Revolution or Rehash?
This colloquy will discuss various aspects of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s formulation and implementation of its new Affirmative Furthering Fair Housing rule, issued in 2015. The rule has stirred a great deal of attention, especially with regard to its potential for encouraging state and local governments to pay more attention to the fair housing aspects of their housing and community development efforts. With renewed attention on economic and racial segregation and its effects, the rule has received even more attention than it might have otherwise. Previous efforts to strengthen HUD’s role in encouraging local governments to further fair housing have often met with great political resistance. Will the current effort meet the same obstacles? Potential discussion questions include: • What does it mean to “affirmatively further fair housing”? What do the regulations suggest? How clear are they? Are they effectively written? • What added value do the new AFFH mapping tools bring to the AFFH process? Will new data and new mapping tools add major value to the process? Will they fundamentally change the process? • How will states or localities actually measure their AFFH efforts/progress? Will they use some sort of standardized measures or indicators? How should local or state efforts be measured? • How much direction should or will HUD give as the process unfolds? Will HUD simply be a data provider or will it (help) develop measures? • How realistic is it for the new rules to actually impact fair housing actions? Will they make any difference? Will AFFH just revert back into the “old” AI process? • Will HUD add teeth the process in terms of actually withholding HUD funding from governments making insufficient process in AFFH?

Speakers
avatar for Dan Immergluck

Dan Immergluck

Professor, Georgia State University
housing, neighborhoods, gentrification, segregation, housing finance, community development
avatar for Alex Schwartz,The New School

Alex Schwartz,The New School

Professor, The New School

Moderators
avatar for Dan Immergluck

Dan Immergluck

Professor, Georgia State University
housing, neighborhoods, gentrification, segregation, housing finance, community development

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Indigo Ballroom B

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.11 Who Speaks for Justice? Raising our Voices in the Noise of Hegemony
My country. My country. T'is of thee I sing. Country still unborn Sweet land yet to be Four panelists will discuss their out-reach to specific communities to break the boundaries in this country between the academic world and the lives of children, parents, and families caught in a vise of inferior schools and oppressive public policies. Panelists will tell theirs and the community’s stories in creating networks that challenge the status-quo of failing institutions. While telling the narratives of small victories rising from those challenges, we will engage the audience in conversations that broaden the context of how we gather together to transform ourselves and our academic communities to better serve our cities. Conscious of the joy amidst the angst in the struggle against hegemony, we offer this panel discussion as an enticement to explore each other’s stories about our battles to be free, as researchers, teachers, learners, citizens. How do we step outside the lines of privilege that we may occupy, while seeking to extricate ourselves from the scholastic shackles that we wear? As a counter to our professional privilege, how do we begin to listen not just to persons with national reputations in circles of justice, but also to youth, friends, and strangers in diverse communities? How do we invite and investigate their lessons, challenges, joys, triumphs, questions? And in sharing those explorations, can we discover what sustains us “from the inside when all else falls away.” But, beyond that, can this process help us to determine together “. . . if we can get up, after a night of grief and despair, weary and bruised to the bone, and do what needs to be done to feed [and teach] the children” (Oriah) in our communities, in our schools, and in this “country still unborn.”

Speakers
ML

Maria Lovett

Florida International University
"Dr. Maria Lovett is an Assistant Professor in the College of Education at Florida International University and former Director of the Education Effect. The Education Effect is FIU’s university-affiliated community school partnership to support educational achievement in the Liberty... Read More →
OM

Ojohari Moses

The Young People's Project
avatar for Joan Wynne

Joan Wynne

Visiting Associate Professor, The Algebra Project
I'm passionate about teaching, children, my Sun-Daughter, husband, Mama2 daughters, family, friends and our small planet earth. I'm also committed to ridding schools of racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia. I love writing and research and I'm passionate about the work of the Algebra... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Joan Wynne

Joan Wynne

Visiting Associate Professor, The Algebra Project
I'm passionate about teaching, children, my Sun-Daughter, husband, Mama2 daughters, family, friends and our small planet earth. I'm also committed to ridding schools of racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia. I love writing and research and I'm passionate about the work of the Algebra... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua 310B

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.12 What Are Book Editors Looking For? Ask Them!
Senior editors from top publishers talk candidly about book publishing for academic authors.  Unique opportunity to ask questions of knowledgeable and experienced book editors. 

Michael McGandy, Cornell University Press (moderator)
Douglas Hildebrand, University of Toronto Press
Fredric Nachbaur, Fordham University Press
Juliana Pitanguy, Springer Publishing
Nicole Solano, Routledge/Taylor & Francis

Speakers
avatar for Douglas Hildebrand

Douglas Hildebrand

Director & Publisher, University of Alberta Press
avatar for Michael McGandy

Michael McGandy

Senior Editor, Cornell University Press
Michael McGandy acquires books in urban history with a focus on New York City and New York State. Follow Michael on Twitter @michaelmcgandy
avatar for Fredric Nachbaur

Fredric Nachbaur

Director, Fordham University Press
As publisher of the Polis: Fordham Series in Urban Studies, I am searching for authors in fields as diverse as American Studies, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Urban Studies and who can write for both academic and informed lay audiences. Our objective is... Read More →
avatar for Juliana Pitanguy

Juliana Pitanguy

Springer Publishing
My name is Juliana Pitanguy and I am Associate Editor at Springer in the Netherlands. I develop the urban studies and urban geography program, inviting interest in publications and encouraging participation.
NS

Nicole Solano

Senior Editor, Routledge | Taylor & Francis
I'm the senior editor for the planning and urban design list at Routledge. In particular, I'm looking for book projects that focus on issues of social justice and equity, affordable housing, service learning in planning and urban design, and cutting-edge research. I would welcome... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Michael McGandy

Michael McGandy

Senior Editor, Cornell University Press
Michael McGandy acquires books in urban history with a focus on New York City and New York State. Follow Michael on Twitter @michaelmcgandy


Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua Salon A/B

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.20 Publishing in Urban Affairs Journals: Editors' Perspectives
This colloquy is organized by the editors of the Journal of Urban Affairs. The panelists are editors from the Journal of Urban Affairs and Urban Affairs Review and they will discuss “how to” and “what not to do” to publish successfully in urban affairs journals. The panel will also discuss the importance and the role of reviewers and how to be a good reviewer.

Speakers
JC

Jered Carr

University of Illinois at Chicago
IV

Igor Vojnovic

Michigan State University

Moderators

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua Salon E

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.02 Creative Spaces and Places in Asia's Urban Areas


Urban Governance of Creative Spaces in Guangzhou
Yanjun Cai, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

The Street Market Experience: Exploring The Interplay Of Space And Place
Nirupama Jayaraman, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras

The Role of Shopping Mall in Urban Planning and Design in The 21th Century, South Korea: Location, Relation with Neighborhood and Developer
Il Lee, Seoul National University; Joo Hyun Park



Speakers
YC

Yanjun Cai

University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
NJ

Nirupama Jayaraman

Indian Institute of Technology, Madras
avatar for IL Lee

IL Lee

Ph.d Candidate, Seoul National University

Sponsors
Moderators
WW

Wen Wang

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Indigo 202A

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.03 Social Equity Struggles and Outcomes in Central and South America and the Caribbean
Moderator: Natalia Villamizar-Duarte, University of Illinois at Chicago

Shifting School Demographics and Educational Equity: Argentine School Personnel Perspectives on Andean and Paraguayan Immigrant Students and Families in Buenos Aires
Jaycee L. Bigham, University of California, Santa Barbara

Removal, Resistance and the Right to the (Olympic) City
Sukari Ivester, California State University-East Bay

Women's Issues in Cuba Since the Revolution of 1959
Sarah Miller Boelts, Grand View University

The Caribbean's Urban Issue of Overcrowding - Shantytowns
Valerie Purry, Jackson State University

Governing Informality: Are Changing Policies on Informality Relevant as Governmental Practices of Urban Planning in Bogota, Colombia?
Natalia Villamizar-Duarte, University of Illinois at Chicago

Speakers
JL

Jaycee L. Bigham

University of California, Santa Barbara
SM

Sarah Miller Boelts

Grand View University
avatar for Sukari Ivester

Sukari Ivester

Assistant Professor, California State University, East Bay
avatar for Valerie A. Purry

Valerie A. Purry

Adjunct/Office Professional, Jackson State University
Valerie A. Purry originally from Oakland, California has been residing in Brandon, Mississippi for twenty years. She attended Cal State University Hayward for three years studied Criminal Justice Administration. She graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal... Read More →

Moderators

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Indigo 202B

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.04 The Link Between Historic Preservation and Neighborhood Revitalization


Place Attachment as a Motivation for Historic Preservation: The Demise of an Old, Bustling, Dubai Community
Khaled Alawadi, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology

Urban Revitalization, Heritage, and Adaptive Reuse: The Work of Lina Bo Bardi and Lelé in Salvador’s Historical Center, Brazil
Gabriela Campagnol, Texas A&M University
 
Preserving Places or People? Historic District Designation and Neighborhood Change in Baltimore
Aaron Passell, Barnard College

Global Urban Factors and Their Impact on the Conservation of World Heritage Cities: An Indicators-based Analysis of International Monitoring Tools
Paloma Guzman, Ana Pereira Roders and Bernard Colenbrander (Eindhoven University of Technology)



Speakers
avatar for Khaled Alawadi

Khaled Alawadi

Assistant Professor, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology
Rethinking the city through sustainability paradigm. Khaled’s research and teaching are focused on the role of urban design and planning in promoting sustainable development and the big question is: “Which urban forms, technological solutions, and policy initiatives will effectively... Read More →
GC

Gabriela Campagnol

Texas A&M University
avatar for Paloma Guzman

Paloma Guzman

phD candidate, Eindhoven University of Technology
Paloma Guzman obtained a major in Architecture from the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education Campus Querétaro (ITEMS CQ), Mexico, and a MA in World Heritage Studies from the Brandenburg Technological University, Cottbus in Germany. Currently, she is member of ICOMOS... Read More →
avatar for Aaron Passell

Aaron Passell

Associate Director, Urban Studies, Barnard College
Historic preservation, gentrification, sustainability, urban development

Moderators
GC

Gabriela Campagnol

Texas A&M University

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Indigo 204B

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.06 Creating and Maintaining Socially Mixed Housing Developments


Social Mix Developments and Social Dynamics Issues: Lessons from Europe and North-America
Hélène Bélanger, Université du Québec à Montréal; Richard Morin, Université du Québec à Montréal

Life Under the Big Housing Tent: Analyzing Characteristics of Mixed-Income Housing Properties
Andy Carswell, University of Georgia; Adenola Osinubi, University of Georgia

Does Socially-Mixed Housing Redevelopment "Work"? Learning from Toronto's Regent Park
James Dunn, McMaster University; Daniel Rowe, University of Toronto

The Loss of Social Diversity in Urban Revitalization and the Promise of Social Impact Assessment to Fix It
Fredrica Kramer, Independent Researcher

Examining Five Common Criticisms of Mixed-Income Housing Development
Dustin Read, Virginia Tech; Andrew Sanderford, University of Arizona

Speakers
avatar for Hélène Bélanger

Hélène Bélanger

Professor, Université du Québec à Montréal
JD

James Dunn

McMaster University
FK

Fredrica Kramer

Independent Researcher

Moderators

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Indigo 206

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.07 Explaining and Addressing Contemporary Residential Segregation


Repackaged “Urban Renewal”: Issues of Environmental Justice in New Construction, Suburban Neighborhoods and Urban Islands of Infill
Melissa Currie, University of Alabama in Huntsville; Janni Sorensen, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Fair Housing in Higher Education: Lessons Learned
Joan Gibran, Tennessee State University; Cara B. Robinson, Tennessee State University

Neighborhood Racial Biases in 21st-Century Housing Appraisals
Junia Howell, Rice University; Elizabeth Korver-Glenn, Rice University

The Architecture of Segregation: Public Policy, Segregation, and the Spatial Dimension of Poverty
Paul A. Jargowsky, Rutgers University - Camden; Katrin B. Anacker, George Mason University; Christopher Wheeler, Rutgers University - Camden

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Currie

Melissa Currie

Lecturer, University of Alabama in Huntsville
I am an experienced assistant professor, licensed landscape architect, and have extensive educational and professional experience in the land planning, landscape architecture, and civil engineering fields. My research focuses on neighborhood-level community resilience and the impacts... Read More →
JG

Joan Gibran

Tennessee State University, Department of Urban Studies
JH

Junia Howell

Rice University
avatar for Paul A. Jargowsky

Paul A. Jargowsky

Director, Center for Urban Research and Education, Rutgers University - Camden

Moderators
avatar for Paul A. Jargowsky

Paul A. Jargowsky

Director, Center for Urban Research and Education, Rutgers University - Camden

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Indigo 204A

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.08 Homelessness and Social Justice


An Examination of Local Efforts to House the Homeless
Jessica L. Perez, University of California, Irvine

A Just City or Just a City—A Policy Analysis of San Antonio, Texas’ Outlawing Homelessness
Arturo Vega, St. Mary's University

Urban Social Finance and its Targets: Housing Homeless People with Goodwill and Profit in Oakland, California
Emily Rosenman, University of British Columbia

Democratic Jouissance: Urban Social Movements and Citizen Experience

Callum Ingram, DePauw University



Speakers
CI

Callum Ingram

DePauw University
JL

Jessica L. Perez

University of California, Irvine
ER

Emily Rosenman

University of British Columbia
AV

Arturo Vega

St. Mary's University

Moderators
DP

David P. Varady, University of Cincinnati

University of Cincinnati
University of Cincinnati

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua 313

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.10 Understanding the Effects of Immigration and Diversity in Cities


The Importance of Sanctuary Cities
Christopher Bardales, University of San Francisco

Immigration and the Perceptions of Undocumented or Unauthorized Immigrants: What the Others Have to Say
Abraham Benavides, The University of North Texas

Socio-Spatial Exclusion and Boundary Constructions Away from the Border: Latino Youth Labor Market Integration in the U.S. South
Claire Schuch, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Ethnic Borders and Ethnicization in Indian Cities: Comparing Surat and Ahmedabad
Zubin Adrianvala, University of Maryland



Speakers
avatar for Zubin Adrianvala

Zubin Adrianvala

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Maryland
Zubin's research is focussed on the ethnic violence in urban areas and its relationship to the physical city. He compared two Indian cities-Surat and Ahmedabad, for my research. The research begins with some simple questions- Why do certain cities experience high levels of ethnic... Read More →
CB

Christopher Bardales

University of San Francisco
AB

Abraham Benavides

The University of North Texas
avatar for Claire Schuch

Claire Schuch

Receptivity, Inclusion, and Community Engagement Postdoctoral Fellow, UNC Charlotte

Moderators
AB

Abraham Benavides

The University of North Texas

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua 311A

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.13 Strategies to Improve Environmental Sustainability


The Real Economic Impact of Reducing Car Dependency in Cities: Jobs, Housing, and Incomes
Chad Frederick, University of Louisville; John "Hans" Gilderbloom, University of Louisville; Billy Riggs, Cal Poly University

Urban Compactness: Beijing Experience
Xilu Liu, Kennesaw State University; Ameen Farooq, Kennesaw State University

Identifying "Equity Voids” to Target Green Infrastructure Investment
Christina Rosan, Temple University; Megan Heckert, West Chester University

Speakers
CF

Chad Frederick

University of Louisville
XL

Xilu Liu

Kennesaw State University
CR

Christina Rosan

Temple University

Moderators
CR

Christina Rosan

Temple University

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua 307

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.14 Fostering Employment Growth: Understanding Firms and Investment Dynamics


Regional Software Production and Economic Development: Portland, Seattle and Austin
Dillon Mahmoudi, Portland State University

Multiple Endeavours to New Patterns of Economic Growth: The Case of Creative and Knowledge Industries in Spain
Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway, University of Barcelona; Marc Pradel-Miquel, University of Barcelona

How is Your Region Creative? A Derived Typology to Inform Economic Development Strategies
Mallory Smith, University of Delaware; Troy Mix, University of Delaware

State-level Determinants of EB-5 Investment
Edward Smith, Wright Johnson LLC

Connecting Workforce Development to Regional Competitiveness: The Synergies Between Firm Growth and Labor Market Development
Shikun Sun, Rutgers-Camden University

Speakers
avatar for Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway, University of Barcelona

Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway, University of Barcelona

Associate Professor, University of Barcelona
DM

Dillon Mahmoudi

Portland State University
ES

Edward Smith

Wright Johnson LLC
MS

Mallory Smith

University of Delaware
SS

Shikun Sun

Rutgers-Camden University

Moderators
avatar for Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway, University of Barcelona

Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway, University of Barcelona

Associate Professor, University of Barcelona

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua Salon C

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.16 Democratizing Urban Theory: A Series of Critical Interventions


Beyond Machines and Regimes: A New Theoretical Framework for Understanding Urban Politics in the 21st century.
Annika Marlen Hinze, Fordham University; Jamie M. Smith, Indiana University South Bend

Whose Sidewalk is it Anyway? Mapping The Policy and Practice of Vending in New York City
Rida Qadri, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The Planetary Urbanization of Kantsaywhere: Urban Competition, Education, and the New Eugenics
Elvin Wyly, University of British Columbia

Speakers
AM

Annika M. Hinze

Fordham University
RQ

Rida Qadri

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
EW

Elvin Wyly

University of British Columbia

Moderators
AM

Annika M. Hinze

Fordham University

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua 305

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.17 Sustainability and Livability: Challenges From Land Use and Development Policies


Toward Transit Corridor Livability: Exploring the Transportation/Land Use/Livability Connection
Bruce Appleyard, San Diego State University

The Metamorphic City: A Sustainability Assessment Method for Post-industrial Cities.
Catalina Freixas, Washington University in St. Louis

Social Sustainability of Neighbourhoods: Towards a Working Framework

M. Reza Shirazi, Oxford Brookes University; ; Ramin Keivani, Oxford Brookes University; Georgia Butina Watson, Oxford Brookes University; Sue Brownill, Oxford Brookes University

How Does the Form of Municipal Government Affect Land Use Policies?
Amal K. Ali, Salisbury University

A Non-Deterministic Planning Framework for Land Use and Density: Land Value Taxation in Place of Zoning?
Reza Amindarbari, North Carolina State University; Perver Baran, North Carolina State University





Speakers
RA

Reza Amindarbari

North Carolina State University
BA

Bruce Appleyard

San Diego State University
MR

M. Reza Shirazi, UC Berkeley

Oxford Brookes University
avatar for Catalina Freixas

Catalina Freixas

Assistant Professor, Washington University in St. Louis

Moderators
avatar for Catalina Freixas

Catalina Freixas

Assistant Professor, Washington University in St. Louis

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua 309

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.21 Municipal Finance: Fiscal Stress and Municipal Strategies
Advisor vs. Underwriter: Costs of Information Asymmetry in Municipal Debt Issuance
Evgenia Gorina, University of Texas at Dallas; Jing Wang, California State Polytechnic University

Non-Resident Users of Government Facilities and Services: Should They be Charged More?
Michael T. Peddle, Northern Illinois University

Private Lending and Public Redevelopment: The Case of Detroit
Richard Hula, Michigan State Univerity; Marty Jordan, Michigan State Univerity

Speakers
EG

Evgenia Gorina

University of Texas at Dallas
RH

Richard Hula

Michigan State Univerity

Moderators

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua Salon D

8:05am PDT

FR8.05.22 Developing Economic and Financial Measures to Prevent and Limit Pollution


Environmental Identity and the Effectiveness of Carbon Markets
Brian Jones, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Environmental Valuation Before and After Land Use Change
Youngre Noh, Texas A&M University; George Rogers, Texas A&M University

Developing Sustainable Recovery Anti-Pollution Policies for China's Huai River
Dan Zhu, University of Florida; Liang Zhou, Nanjing University

Speakers
BJ

Brian Jones

University of North Carolina at Charlotte
I am a doctoral candidate in the Public Policy program at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. My primary research focus is on energy and environmental economics.
YN

Youngre Noh

Texas A&M University
DZ

Dan Zhu

University of Florida

Moderators
GR

Gordana Rabrenovic

Northeastern University

Friday March 18, 2016 8:05am - 9:30am PDT
Aqua Salon F

9:30am PDT

Friday - Coffee Break
Friday March 18, 2016 9:30am - 9:50am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:49am PDT

Friday - Poster Sessions
Friday March 18, 2016 9:49am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS1.0 Hurricane Sandy and New York City Population & Housing Characteristics
Hurricane Sandy struck the Northeastern United States in November 2012, causing over a hundred fatalities and enormous economic damages. New York City bore much of the brunt of the storm, including a third of all U.S. fatalities, $19 billion in property and infrastructure damage, and the complete destruction of thousands of residences. Making use of longitudinal data from the New York City Housing and Vacancy Survey, this study examines changes in housing and population characteristics since Sandy struck. Changes in housing characteristics such as size, owner occupancy, and rent, as well as householder characteristics such as race and socioeconomic status are described in neighborhoods flooded by Sandy during the 2011 and 2014 waves of the survey that bookend the storm. Changes in housing characteristics in flooded areas are then compared to changes in unaffected areas to suggest the proportion of housing changes attributable to Sandy. It is anticipated that some severely affected neighborhoods may become younger and possibly lower socioeconomic status. Some neighborhoods may actually see increased housing sizes and values, as the experience of previous hurricane disasters demonstrates that some homeowners are able to use rebuilding funds to improve their residences to a higher standard than existed prior to the hurricane event.

Speakers
NF

Nathan Frey

The Pennsylvania State University


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS10.0 Homeownership and Housing Outcomes: Does Tenure Really Make a Difference?
Authors: Kristin Aarland, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences; Carolina Reid, University of California Berkeley      

Homeownership has long been associated with a myriad of economic, social and civic benefits, including increased wealth and economic stability, greater political participation, and access to better neighborhoods and schools. As a result, expanding homeownership among lower-income families has been a cornerstone of housing policy in many countries. However, comparisons between renters and owners are plagued by the correlation between tenure and socioeconomic characteristics as well as selection bias, making it hard to convincingly attribute differences in housing outcomes to tenure alone. In this paper, we present new evidence on the causal impact of homeownership on housing outcomes, focusing on housing and neighborhood quality. Does homeownership increase the likelihood that a low-income family will live in a “better” home or a “better” neighborhood? To answer these questions, we employ a unique, longitudinal dataset of renters who applied for a state mortgage program in Norway between 2004 and 2009. While the mortgage program is nationwide, it is administered locally by 428 municipalities, giving rise to substantial heterogeneity in program criteria and approval rates, meaning that renters with similar characteristics may be approved for a mortgage in one municipality but rejected in another. This heterogeneity allows us to control for selection bias in the decision to become a homeowner: while all applicants to the program reveal their desire to own, not all will receive a mortgage and be able to act on it. Using propensity score matching to select comparable renters and new owners in the data, we observe outcomes for the two groups through the end of 2013. We present evidence on two outcomes: neighborhood attainment (e.g., do owners live in higher income or higher wealth neighborhoods) and housing quality (e.g., are they less likely to live in crowded or poorly maintained units).

Speakers
KA

Kristin Aarland, Oslo and Akershus University

Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS13.0 Housing Experiences of Cuban Refugees in the Miami Metropolitan Area
Amid the recent migrant crisis in Europe that has spurred discussions on displaced population and refugees on a global scale, this research aims to study the housing experiences of Cuban refugees in the Miami metropolitan area. Since the initial Cuban immigration to the U.S. that dates back to the 1960s, a large influx of Cuban refugees to the Miami metropolitan area has influenced not only its demography but also its housing market. Despite many of the studies on Cuban refugees in the Miami metropolitan area that have been conducted from the viewpoint of sociology, psychology, or political science, their housing experiences have not been well investigated. This research focuses on finding the role of housing during resettlement process among Cuban refugees and similarities and differences in housing experiences between the resettled refugees in the early 2000s and in the 2010s through qualitative analysis of data obtained from the interviews with a sample of Cuban refugee households. The study findings on housing issues that Cuban refugees faced in the 2000s and in the 2010s from the perspective of planning could help local planners better understand the housing needs of Cuban refugees in the community and plan for the present and future refugee communities.

Speakers
SH

Seyeon Hwang

University of Florida


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS14.0 Metropolitan Size and Housing Affordability Stress in U.S. Metropolitan Areas
The housing affordability literature has had much to say on the underlying influences on housing affordability over time. Yet today there remains a curious lack of studies that examine influences across different size classes of metropolitan areas over the long term. Utilizing a dynamic panel system Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) estimator, I analyze 1980-2010 Decennial Census and American Community Survey data to reveal influences on renter and owner housing affordability stress in metropolitan counties grouped by metropolitan area size. I find that increases in household incomes are most strongly and consistently linked to lower levels of housing affordability stress across all size classes. Similarly, rises in home values are closely connected to rising levels of affordability stress. However the impact of home values on renter cost burden decreases with metropolitan area size, while the impact of household income gains on reducing housing cost burdens is much higher in small metros than large metros. The results show that number and strength of influences on housing affordability stress can vary greatly by the size of the metropolitan area.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Wheeler

Christopher Wheeler

Rutgers University Camden


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS15.0 Exploring Urban Youths' Perceptions of Recreation Centers in Atlanta, Georgia
In his 2010 Inauguration address, newly elected Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia, Kasim Reed made a promise to invest in the well-being and development of the city’s youngest citizens through the Centers of Hope Initiative. Mayor Reed’s promise involved securing funds from the municipal budget and corporate sponsors to reopen and revitalize several of the city’s 33 closed and abandoned recreation centers. The public-private investment in the recreation centers represents the municipality’s valuation of these institutions as important sites for young people’s development through adolescence and into adulthood. While the administration’s vision of the recreation centers’ purpose is clear, no systematic study examining meaning of these recreation centers in the lives of Atlanta’s youth has been conducted. This paper addresses this gap in the research by asking the question: what are urban youths’ perceptions of the recreation centers affiliated with the Mayor’s Centers of Hope Initiative? This study explores this question through qualitative analysis of data collected through focus groups and interviews with young people in Atlanta, public documents from the city and recreation centers, and existing scholarly literature. This analysis expects to find that young people’s perceptions of Atlanta’s recreation centers are shaped by their level of participation in the facilities, their attachment to other institutions in the urban ecology, and the centers’ capacity to address their developmental needs.

Speakers
avatar for Cameron Herman

Cameron Herman

PhD Candidate, Michigan State University


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS16.0 Measuring Social Impact: Using the Capability Approach to Explore How Social Enterprises Combat Social Problems
The capability approach provides a multidimensional perspective on poverty consisting of both social and economic factors. Because social enterprises aim to create both social and economic value, previous research contends the approach can be used to measure impact of its activities. Impact measurement is greatly needed in the social enterprise sector, as few empirical studies have been conducted to provide insight on their value. This mixed-method exploratory study seeks to examine social and economic value creation in the social enterprise sector.

Speakers
RW

Rasheda Weaver

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS18.0 Why the Performance of Modern Streetcar in China does Not Meet Expectations? A Case Study of Modern Streetcar in Nanjing and Shanghai
There has been increased popularity of streetcar investments in China because of its relatively high transport capacity with moderate cost and environmental friendly features. However, the actual performance of modern streetcar in China does not meet the projects’ expectations. This paper chooses two modern streetcar lines (Nanjing Hexi Modern Streetcar and Shanghai Zhangjiang Modern Streetcar) to examine their performances based on their transportation objectives and urban development objectives through qualitative analysis. Both lines have low ridership, low speed, low frequency and high operation costs. One important reason is the location of these two lines. Unlike the locations of streetcar lines in US and Europe which are often in central city area, these two lines are located in areas outside the central city to connect the new town. This kind of location cannot provide enough passengers to the modern streetcar. Other reasons include complicated traffic conditions and safety concerns. For the urban development objectives, the paper examines their impacts on urban landscape, economic development, and new town development. The Nanjing Hexi Modern Streetcar had carried lots of passengers during the Youth Olympic Game. It also contributes to the urban landscape. The Shanghai Zhangjiang Modern Streetcar meets the commute demand of the new town. However, these two modern streetcar lines’ contributions to urban development are limited. Findings of this paper can provide insightful lessons for other modern streetcar projects in China.

Speakers
DF

Da Fei

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS19.0 Informal Settlements in the Contested City: A Case Study of Aleppo During the Syrian Civil War
Against the backdrop of an increasingly urban, highly fluid civil war, the Syrian city of Aleppo stands as a highly contested space. Reflecting nation-wide trends in urbanisation, Aleppo experienced rapid rates of rural-urban migration in the 10 years preceding the current conflict. Many new migrants found themselves located in informal settlements, where the urban poor bear the brunt of over-stretched infrastructure. While literature has argued that informal settlements provide a breeding ground for conflict, little analysis has been produced that examines the role of Aleppo's informal settlements in the current conflict. This paper seeks to fill the existing gap in knowledge through an analysis of the informal settlements of Aleppo in the context of the Syrian Civil War, ultimately highlighting the interwoven relationship between the nature of the 'informal' and 'formal'. Key to the analysis presented here is open-­source data on the damage that has occurred in Aleppo, which has been distilled and mapped against the existing land use types of Aleppo. The maps produced highlight the disproportionate damage that has occurred in the city's informal settlements and point to an indelible need for a more nuanced understanding of these urban areas. Furthermore, this paper argues against dichotomised stigmatisations of informal settlements as 'feral cities' that are 'void of any social structures' (Norton, 2003 p. 98), instead positing that current understandings should be extended to capture the immense heterogeneity and strengths present in these urban areas. Finally, it is argued that embedded in the folds of formality and informality are multifarious civil society networks that should be supported by the international community.

Speakers
avatar for Felicity Cain

Felicity Cain

University of Sydney


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS20.0 Hmong American Farmers in Wisconsin: Economic Adaptation Through Agriculture
The presence of Hmong farmers in urban agriculture and in the local markets is suggested to be growing at a rapid pace. To understand their role and how they construct their economic adaptation patterns in through utilizing urban agriculture this study ask: How have Hmong farmers adapted into the economic market of the United States? What are the challenges? What are possible solutions to those challenges? This study utilizes interview data collected from Hmong farmers, existing related literature, newspapers, and related websites. Key findings: Hmong farmers in the United States use heavy machinery along with small amounts of pesticides. However, there is a transition to certified organic operations and produce for reasons of health and increasing profits. Immediate and extended family assistance is necessary for a successful harvest from soil to the point of sale and is especially crucial when farmers also work full-time jobs. The additional income earned through full-time positions outside of agriculture help increase land ownership and the amount of farmable land. Farmers markets are particularly important as they provide farmers a site to sell produce, accumulate income, and display pride in their produce. Challenges still remain and consist of racism, discrimination, and receiving break-even income that limit opportunities to expand and become self-sufficient. The path to self-sufficiency may come from changing local land zoning policies. Currently, Milwaukee, Oak Creek, and Wauwatosa only provide small rental plots of land that may be only enough to provide for self-consumption and not enough to enter into competition with other farmers. Increasing land ownership through culturally aware programs for farmers may also be a path to self-sufficiency. Additionally, increasing awareness and opportunities through formal organizational participation may help farmers. Further research is essential to evaluating other opportunities for advancement and eliminating barriers to success.

Speakers
SL

Shuayee Ly

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS21.0 From Plan to Practice: How to Measure the Impacts of Long-Range Transportation Plans?
How do transportation master plans and their implementation affect the democratic practices of the local governments pursuing them? Long-range transportation plans vary in levels of specificity. They contain both detailed policy goals and tools along with vague broad goals with only suggested policy tools. Implementation of these plans occurs through the built form of the transportation networks within cities and require periodic review and updating. Through these divergent styles of long-range planning, questions around accountability, policy learning and policy capacity arise. By remaining vague and broad in scope, do these plans allow for flexibility in the transportation systems as they are implemented based upon policy learning and external factors? Alternatively, do they simply provide political cover for decision makers to implement unpopular decisions avoiding democratic accountability? By remaining vague, are they acknowledging a lack of policy capacity to reach the stated goals? Counter to this, do more specific long-range plans lock the government into a course of action reducing any potential policy learning but ensuring policy path dependence? Two global cities, Singapore and Vancouver, have enacted such plans. Both of these metropolitan regions have pursued development of transportation systems that balance multi-modal networks for the movement of goods and people. Yet, both exist in different policy contexts. Evaluating these long-range policy documents will help us understand their implementation, interpretation and whether citizens can hold their governments accountable not only for the content of these documents but also the outcomes they produce they produce on the environment, economy and social life. This poster seeks to establish a framework enabling this level of analysis. It seeks to draw upon methodology from urban planning, public policy and political science, among others in developing a framework that can shed light on the development, implementation and outcomes of transportation master plans.

Speakers
MO

Michael Oram

Simon Fraser University


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS22.0 Neighborhood change, one pint at a time: The impact of local characteristics on craft breweries
Authors: Jesus Barajas, University of California - Berkeley; Geoff Boeing, University of California - Berkeley; Julie Wartell, University of California - San Diego

Since the 1980s, the craft beer boom in the United States has radically changed the market for beer across the country. By the end of 2013, there were over 2800 breweries nationwide, with year-over-year double-digit percentage increases in growth. The Brewers Association estimates that the craft beer industry provides 108,400 local-serving jobs at breweries and brewpubs and contributes an economic impact of nearly $34 billion (Brewers Association 2014). Craft beer brings jobs and consumers to the local economy, but there is a reciprocal open question about its role in neighborhood change, revitalization, and gentrification. In this study, we analyzed US Census data in conjunction with a unique dataset of brewery-owned locations opened and/or closed from 2004 to 2015. Our hypothesis was that the proliferation of new brewery sites is likely to have an impact on the fabric of neighborhoods. We found a slightly different story than that told by previous researchers. Our study indicated links between brewery growth and demographic change at a neighborhood level, but not necessarily the same links that would suggest a strong relationship between breweries and gentrification. Our poster describes the neighborhood characteristics of where craft breweries operate and uses logistic regression models to understand how temporal changes in residential composition suggest factors that influence craft brewery location decisions. It also explores differences at regional and sub-regional spatial scales, supplemented by qualitative insights from a survey of craft brewers who recently opened facilities. Lastly, we offer some suggestions for urban planning and policy as other cities turn to craft brewing as an opportunity for neighborhood revitalization, economic development, and tourism.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Wartell

Julie Wartell

University of California - San Diego


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS23.0 The Spatial Dimension of the Relationship between Concentrated Poverty and Health: An Analysis of U.S. Metropolitan and Micropolitan Areas, 2001-2010
This paper aims to explore the spatial relationship between health outcomes and the distribution of concentrated poverty and economic segregation across U.S metro areas. There has been much attention afforded to the issue of rising inequality and pockets of intense poverty in general, and an ongoing debate exists on the magnitude and scope of the associated impacts on various societal conditions. Much of the attention has traditionally been placed on the link between economic inequality and health, particularly in social science research. This paper recognizes a gap in the research by way of looking at the effect of concentrated poverty on the processes furthering disparities in health attainment through economic isolation of neighborhoods and increasing marginalization of distressed urban population groups. The author constructs a multilevel model to analyze pooled data for the years 2001 and 2010 from the BRFSS and ACS national level surveys at both the individual and metropolitan/micropolitan (MMSA) scales. The second component to the analysis relies on spatial autocorrelation and the estimation of the Global Moran's I index using GIS software to identify and quantify hot spots of high poverty (at the census tract level) within MSAs, as well as identify trends and changes over the time period of the analysis as these relate to health outcomes and risk factors. Preliminary results show a relatively strong, persistent, and significant association between the metro-level geographic distribution and patterning of poverty and the level of health disparities for a given MSA. Finally, the paper concludes with conclusions and recommendations for policy.

Speakers
avatar for Straso Jovanovski, Rutgers University - Camden

Straso Jovanovski, Rutgers University - Camden

PhD Candidate, Public Affairs (Community Development track), Rutgers University - Camden
I am interested in community-level health care delivery; studying the impact of health care initiatives and programs targeted at vulnerable populations in the distressed urban environment. I like using GIS mapping software in portraying trends and patterns relating to health care... Read More →


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS27.0 Exploring Synergies Between Climate Change and Social Vulnerability On Urban Health in Latin America
The aim of this study is to explore the synergistic effects of climate change and social vulnerability on population health of urban areas, using El Niño-Southern Oscillation and cholera emergence in Latin America as a case study. El Niño, which originates in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, is an important source of climate variability, often associated with extreme weather events and hazards, which in turn, have the potential to create high impacts on the natural, social and built environments in cities. Resources and infrastructures, which ultimately protect communities from disease, can be overwhelmed and destroyed as a result of weather-related disasters. Consequently, the alteration of urban ecologies may increases the risk for waterborne disease transmission and other health effects (e.g., heat stress and food security), which is determinant on the vulnerability context (i.e., social, economic and political, and existing health conditions) of communities. To date, most studies examine the effects of climate and social factors of vulnerability, independently; few have modeled their interactive effects on urban health, and thus this work explores this gap of knowledge. Drawing on geography, urban studies and climate change research, this study presents an integrated framework that models the synergies between climate changes and social processes to explain the emergence of epidemic cholera in Latin America at multiple scales. Preliminary findings will be discussed.

Speakers
IR

Ivan Ramirez

The New School


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS28.0 Power by the People: Why Law-Abiding Citizens Support Criminal Organizations?
Why did ordinary citizens protest rather than celebrate the incarceration or killing of a leader of a criminal organization? From the late 1990s to 2010, the social power of criminal organizations in Jamaica’s urban communities has been dramatized by a series of protests and violent demonstrations, primarily led by women, in response to law enforcement’s attempts to arrest leaders of criminal organizations. The bulk of recent research on the politics of urban-based criminal organizations focuses on the inadequacy of state institutions and directs theoretical attention to relations between the state and criminal organizations or state and society. While this provides insights into the social, political, and economic context in which urban criminal organizations emerge, it tells us very little about the social structure of communities governed by criminal organizations or the relational dynamics between residents and criminal organizations. The research project is a comparative analysis across and within parishes and urban neighbourhoods in Kingston, Jamaica, over the past thirty years. This paper examines the motivations and decision-making processes that result in ordinary citizens risking their security in support of criminal organizations through qualitative analysis of data gathered from secondary sources (police records, government documents, newspapers etc.), participant observation, and ethnographic interviews with community members, agents involved in criminal organizations, law enforcement officials, and local authorities. The preliminary research findings move beyond the predominantly structural approach to understanding criminal organizations and theorize how criminal organizations develop social power and legitimacy at the community level.

Speakers
LT

Lahoma Thomas

University of Toronto


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS29.0 Community Input for the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry
The San Ysidro Port of Entry Expansion Project is not only a bi-national endeavor but also a work of coordination of many interests on the US-side of the borer. The project does not have just one pot of money nor was it birthed out of a series of meetings of a consistent committee. Rather, it was the work of gathering input from a variety of governmental and non-governmental organizations. Aside from business and government players, many community members and organizations also articulated their desires for the Port of Entry, including that it be walkable and visually attractive, in addition to being efficient. Necessarily, not all suggestions could be or were incorporated. This preliminary research, presented visually, seeks to answer 1) which recommendations from the community were incorporated into the current Port of Entry and by whom were they recommended and 2) which were left out, and by whom were these recommended? To answer these questions, the researcher will define who has spoken for the San Ysidro community and evaluate motivating agendas behind their voices. Suggestions from the community will be organized into the following categories: walk/bike-ability, breathability liveability and connectivity. Thematic analysis will be done on planning documents and minutes of San Ysidro Community Plan & Land Use Plan (2015), City of San Diego’s San Ysidro Port of Entry Reconfiguration Mobility Study (2010), SANDAG’s Border Health Equity Transportation Study (2015) and notes from GSA’s San Ysidro Community Representatives Committee, to name a few. Recommendations will be made to incorporate some outstanding suggestions as the Port of Entry Expansion project continues (expected until at least 2019). The potential is significant for this Port of Entry at the busiest land border crossing in this hemisphere to also be an example to the world of how to create a 21st century border.


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS31.0 The Retail Wars: The Built Suburban Environment and the Evolution of Community in Maryvale, Arizona, 1970-1980
This project examines a series of political conflicts between neighborhood level civic activists and regional grass-tops in the suburban community of Maryvale, Arizona. The results of this conflict reflect nascent research on the relationship between local control over the built environment and the formation of community in suburban communities. Maryvale, one of the first master-planned communities in the Phoenix area, arose from cotton fields in the mid-fifties as local residents and commercial investors joined forces to rapidly develop an attractive and affordable post-war suburban community. By the seventies, residents began to agitate for elected officials to allow for more community input on the physical development of the community. However, the community-oriented desires of local residents often clashed with the development-oriented perspective of elected officials and forced a series of public confrontations between the local civic community and regional leadership on how the democratic development of Maryvale would occur. Using government planning records, Social Explorer census data, and ArcGIS mapping systems, this study shows that despite the fact Maryvale was initially developed with community-oriented “neighborhood niches,” “anchoring institutions,” and “third places,” regional leadership undermined community formation through undemocratic methods which limited the ability of the local civic community to control the development of the neighborhood. The conceptualization and experience of community formation in Maryvale makes it an ideal case study on the history of community formation in postwar America.

Speakers
AP

Anthony Pratcher II

University of Pennsylvania History Department


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS32.0 Considerations for Modeling Natural Hazard Evacuation of Mobile Neighborhoods and Mobile Parks in the Texas Valley Region
Historically the Texas Valley region has faced more convergence of natural disasters and a higher concentration of vulnerable population than in any other part of the United States. By focusing on this region, this study evaluates the location and distribution of mobile neighborhoods and parks to its vicinity in pursuance of generating accurate demand forecasts and address demand variability utilizing demand modeling in evacuation. This region has particular characteristics, mostly elucidated by the regional vocation. Gibson et at. (2006) show the place strong economic and cultural heritage, established by educational assets and a rapidly growing of bi-literate workforce. A parallel between the development stage of the cities in this region and other settlements across the United States, as American company towns, tries to framework important sociological factors not yet presumed in hazard investigations, such as the privatization of the urban space and peri-urbanisation. The enlightenment of these factors has potential to headline modern public protocols and increase the natural disasters evacuation compliance and successful rate. Complementary, this study observes the demography of the mobile neighborhoods and mobile parks residents, which helps in the analysis of social and organizational structures behind the urban and suburban geography, one that will impact straight in the region disaster alertness, preparedness, and mobility, at individual and county management levels. This paper suggests a different approach when overlooking the "facilitators and barriers" for employing this technique in mandatory evacuations. The importance of this study lays in new boundaries for future evacuation research and development of decision making models, simultaneously raising questions about contemporary sociological characteristics nurtured by mobile neighborhoods and mobile parks in low density and high poverty rate cities.

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Abuabara

Alexander Abuabara

PhD student, Texas A&M University


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS33.0 Route Restructuring of TARTA at Downtown Loop in Toledo, Ohio
Taslima Akter; Jonathon Ousky; Dr. Bhuiyan M. Alam

“Route Restructuring of TARTA at Downtown Loop in Toledo, Ohio” is an extensive study on public transit. The Toledo Area Regional Transit Authority (TARTA) is the main public transit in Toledo, Ohio since 1971. The transportation systems of TARTA links different areas of the city together with each other, and also connect the city with the surrounding suburbs. As there is no transportation hub in Toledo downtown, TARTA is planning to build one. The researchers figure out whether the current bus routes in the downtown loop are efficient or not. The main purpose of this research is to develop new bus routes for TARTA in the downtown Toledo loop. The researchers identify the best routes that the buses should take to and from the new transportation hub. The study area for this research is downtown Toledo. The researchers read numerous scientific articles and case studies on route restructuring in other cities of the United States. The researchers learn about the physical characteristics of the study area and about how TARTA operates. At the end of the study, the study team come up with possible changes for TARTA and develop a new network of bus routes. The main purposes of the new routes are to make riding TARTA easier for the passengers and to reduce the expenditures of TARTA. This research shows the new routes and the reasoning behind them.




Speakers
avatar for Taslima Akter

Taslima Akter

Graduate Student, The University of Toledo
Transportation planner.


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

9:50am PDT

PS5.0 The Portland Climate Action Collaborative: From City Vulnerability Assessment to Community Resilience-Building
Authors: Anandi van Diepen-Hedayat, Portland State University; Vivek Shandas, Portland State University; Jackson Voelkel, Portland State University

Climate action plans are now commonplace among city planning agencies in the United States and beyond. These documents have generated a great deal of strategy for mitigation of the emissions that lead to climate change. Less developed, however, is the body of planning and policy knowledge to fuel adaptation of the impacts of climate change to human health. In 2014, Portland State University researchers partnered with the city's Bureau of Planning and Sustainability to study and strategize toward the goal of improving community/neighborhood-scale resilience to extreme heat and air pollution. This poster discusses three phases of this project. Phase I, completed in the past year, entailed spatial statistical analysis of demographic and geographic risk factors to these two hazards, for a city-wide vulnerability assessment. This included an interactive web tool for planners' and other stakeholders' inquiry into the assessment's multidimensional findings. Phase II, currently underway, involves qualitative investigation of the hazard-specific coping mechanisms of individuals and households in the neighborhoods assessed as vulnerable. Phase III, also in development presently, connects public agencies with community members in piloting planning and public health strategies to reduce vulnerability and promote resilience. The three-phase project is jointly sponsored by the Institute for Sustainable Solutions at Portland State University and the National Science Foundation's Sustainability Research Network grant, "Urban Resilience to Extremes."

Speakers
AV

Anandi van Diepen-Hedayat

Portland State University


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS7.0 Access to Access: Healthcare for Immigrant and Refugee Populations in San Francisco
With a history of migration deeply rooted in its foundation, San Francisco has been at the forefront of implementing culturally inclusive policies. In addition to federal and state legislation, San Francisco voters have passed numerous local policies aimed at improving the healthcare safety net for immigrant and refugee populations, including its Sanctuary City status and Municipal ID program. 45% of the city’s population does not speak English at home, 13% live in linguistically isolated households, and 36% are immigrants. The city’s diverse demography and inclusive policies make for a unique case study, particularly in its measurable access to healthcare. Availability of resources does not equate to accessibility to resources, so this research aims to use ArcGIS to evaluate the accessibility of healthcare for San Franciscan immigrant and refugee populations. Methods: Using data from 2010 Census and the American Community Survey, this research measures accessibility geospatially. Geoprocessing tools include hot spot analysis, cluster analysis, and network analysis. Key Findings: San Franciscan ethnic and language communities occur in clusters. Medi-Cal providers and Federally Qualified Health Centers offering services in languages other than English, forming the healthcare safety net for immigrant and refugee populations, are lacking in their accessibility to these clusters. Geospatial analysis of linguistically isolated households and Limited English Proficiency persons enhances potential strategies for improving healthcare accessibility.

Speakers
AS

Amanda Smith

University of San Francisco


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

9:50am PDT

PS9.0 Hidden Faces in Hidden Places: Engagoing Youth to Map, Photograph, and Facilitate Action around Suburban Food Insecurity
Authors: Dan Remley, Ohio State Univeristy Extension; Bernadette Hanlon, Ohio State Univeristy City and Regional Planning; Kareem Usher, Ohio State Univeristy City and Regional Planning; Irene Hatsu, Ohio State University; Glennon Sweeney, Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University; Kevin Harris, Ohio State University Extension

The changing geography of poverty suggests that food insecurity is becoming a growing concern in many suburban communities. Research suggests that the suburban built environment also presents unique challenges to accessing healthy foods including transportation challenges, difficulties accessing public assistance offices, and a lack of awareness and stigmatization surrounding the use of public assistance. Some interventions which have sought to address these issues in urban environments have been met with mixed results, such as policies incentivizing the siting of grocery stores, the establishment of farmer’s market EBT programs, or Health Corner store initiatives. Much of the criticism surrounding such initiatives is simply that the low-income beneficiary communities are often left out of the planning process. In community-based participatory research (CBPR), researchers work in partnership with communities to define both the issues that the community faces as well as the possible solutions to those challenges. This study employs Healthy Eating and Active Living Mapping Attributes using Participatory Photographic Surveys (HEAL MAPPS), a CBPR tool that can engage communities to address food access issues. Using photography and mapping, youth HEAL “MAPPERS” navigate regular routes in their suburban Ohio communities, telling the story of what makes it easy or difficult to access healthy, safe food in socially acceptable ways. The maps created, are utilized to start a community dialogue around these issues, resulting in a community action plan to address them. Findings include increased transportation-related access issues when compared to urban spaces and a high degree of stigma associated with receiving food assistance in this suburban community as major barriers to both healthy food access and emergency food assistance. This poster will detail the methods and process through which this community plan was created, highlighting the findings of the HEAL MAPPERS.

Speakers
avatar for Glennon Sweeney

Glennon Sweeney

Research Associate, The Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University


Friday March 18, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Indigo West Foyer

10:29am PDT

Friday - Concurrent Sessions
Friday March 18, 2016 10:29am - 11:55am PDT
See session listing
  Panels

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.05 The Fair Housing / Community Development Debate
Fair housing advocates frequently criticize the placement of subsidized and affordable housing in disadvantaged neighborhoods. This is considered by such advocates as reinforcing patterns of segregation and concentrated poverty. Fair housing advocates are suspicious of such practices even when they are characterized as part of larger revitalization strategies. Some in the movement have even taken to calling community developers a “poverty housing industry.” This stance puts them at odds with community development practitioners who see affordable and better quality housing as an important need in disadvantaged neighborhoods, and as a legitimate policy objective in such neighborhoods. Although this tension has always been a part of affordable housing policy, the debate has heightened over the past 10 years. Several national summits have occurred to attempt to bring fair housing advocates and community development practitioners together to resolve these issues (to little avail). Several academic journal articles, blogs, on-line articles, and national media pieces have considered this question, as well. This colloquy brings together four experts on the issue. Our presentations will examine this debate and the various policy and normative elements that underpin the two arguments. We will describe and analyze the points of opposition and agreement. Finally, the two positions will be examined in light of changing demographic patterns in American cities, and the recent Supreme Court ruling on disparate impact, and recent HUD regulations related to Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing.

Speakers
KC

Karen Chapple

University of California,Berkeley
DI

David Imbroscio

University of Louisville

Moderators

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Indigo 204B

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.11 Municipal-University Partnerships for Sustainable Communities- Lessons From the Sage Project at San Diego State University
The Sage Project is a partnership between San Diego State University (SDSU) and a local government in the San Diego region. Students, through their course work, engage in meaningful real-world projects by assisting local governments with partner-directed projects that address their livability and sustainability goals. By connecting with high-priority, high-need community projects, SDSU students and faculty generate interest and fresh ideas that create momentum and provide real service to the community. The Sage Project is part of the Educational Partnerships for Innovation in Communities (EPIC) Network, and is based on the highly successful and award winning Sustainable City Year Program at the University of Oregon. Like the project in Oregon, the Sage Project at SDSU engages hundreds of students each year who invest thousands of hours assisting communities in the region. During this colloquium, the Director of the Sage project will discuss the origins of the Sage project and the model advanced at several universities nationwide through the EPIC network. Three faculty from the SDSU School of Public Affairs will discuss the applied projects their students engaged in in the City of National City, the region highest density and lowest per-capital income city on the U.S. side of the border. Finally, the Director of Economic Development for the City of National City will discuss the impact this partnership has had on the City, and if and how the City has integrated student recommendations and findings.

Speakers
BA

Bruce Appleyard

San Diego State University
JB

Jessica Barlow

San Diego State University
SF

Shawn Flanigan

San Diego State University
BR

Brad Raulston

City of National City

Moderators
SF

Shawn Flanigan

San Diego State University

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua 305

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.19 A Memorial to the Life and Scholarship of Don Phares
This Colloquy will focus on the contributions long time UAA member of Don Phares (1942-2015) to the Urban Affairs Association, urban scholarship, his university (University of Missouri-St. Louis), the St. Louis region and the profession.

Speakers
DF

Donald F. Norris, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Director, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Donald F. Norris (a.k.a. Don – definitely not Donald!) is Director of the School of Public Policy and Director of the Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis and Research at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. His fields of study include: (1) urban affairs broadly but with... Read More →
DM

Daniel Monti

Saint louis University
TS

Todd Swanstrom

Professor in Community Collaboration and Public Po, University of Missouri-St. Louis

Moderators
DF

Donald F. Norris, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Director, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Donald F. Norris (a.k.a. Don – definitely not Donald!) is Director of the School of Public Policy and Director of the Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis and Research at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. His fields of study include: (1) urban affairs broadly but with... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua 311A

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.20 Getting Tenure/Promotion -Teaching/Service Strategies (COLLOQUY ORGANIZED BY UAA VICE CHAIR)
The transition to a tenure track position in higher education presents early career scholars with a number of new challenges. Among them is the need to balance research, teaching, and service obligations. Too often, junior faculty members are asked to manage these responsibilities without a great deal of advice from senior faculty. This colloquy was organized to bridge this gap. In it panelists will identify strategies for balancing research, teaching, and service obligations, with a particular focus on teaching and service. They will also discuss pitfalls to avoid in these areas. Topics to be addressed include seeking mentors, the use of technology, peer and student teaching evaluations, course preparations, various types of service (professional, university, departmental, and community), and administrative responsibilities.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Professor, University at Buffalo
Rob Silverman's research focuses on the non-profit sector, the role of community-based organizations in urban neighborhoods, education reform, and inequality in inner city housing markets. His current research projects include studies of non-profit finance and advocacy,school reform,shrinking... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Ferman

Barbara Ferman

Professor, Temple University
Born and raised in Brooklyn (which is still the 4th largest city!), I had an early education about urban areas that was shaped by some very practical activities – turning empty lots into playgrounds, keeping the hand ball court for hours, dodging traffic, and learning the subway... Read More →
NR

Nicole Ruggiano

Florida International University

Moderators
avatar for Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Professor, University at Buffalo
Rob Silverman's research focuses on the non-profit sector, the role of community-based organizations in urban neighborhoods, education reform, and inequality in inner city housing markets. His current research projects include studies of non-profit finance and advocacy,school reform,shrinking... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua 311B

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.01 Rural Migrants in Transitional Urban China: Marginality, Agency and Social Justice (III)
Rural migrants in transitional urban China have received extensive scholarly attention from all social sciences disciplines. While the large corpus of studies on this peculiar social group have unraveled in depth their unequal access to citizenship, relatively less effort has been made to examine theoretically the uneven structure of power in which rural migrants are located. Yet, this structure of uneven power specifies an identity category that feeds into a variety of exploitative relations, not simply in the domain of economy, but in all aspects of the lifeworld. As Fulong Wu (2010) trenchantly argues, the curtailing of migrant welfare and the sequestration of this social group to a “state of exception” serves the state to preserve China’s competitiveness in a global market. Also, as the three proposed panels attempt to cast some light, the state manipulates and appropriates differentiated citizenship to advance various ends of governance. This panel is the continuation of the two panel proposals submitted respectively by Dr Junxi Qian and Dr Jun Wang, entitled Rural migrants in transitional urban China: marginality, agency and social justice (I) and (II). This final one of the series of panels avoids the trap of institutionalism, and draws our attention to the ways in which migrants negotiate marginality, develop coping tactics and create new possibilities of integration and empowerment.

Small Property Right Housing Development in China, an Emerging Counterforce for Transient Urbanism
Shenjing He, The University of Hong Kong

Contended Spaces of Migrants in Songjiang, Shanghai
Sea Eun Cho, Seoul National University

What Determines the Settlement Intention of Rural Migrants in China? Economic Incentives Versus Sociocultural Conditions
Shaowei Chen, Tsinghua University

The Determinants of Settlement Intentions of Multi-Ethnic Migrants in Northwest China
Bo Zhang, University of Groningen




Speakers
SC

Shaowei Chen

Tsinghua University
SE

Sea Eun Cho

Seoul National University
avatar for Shenjing He

Shenjing He

The University of Hong Kong
BZ

Bo Zhang

Ph.D candidate, University of Groningen

Sponsors
Moderators
avatar for Shenjing He

Shenjing He

The University of Hong Kong

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Indigo 202A

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.02 Sense of Place and Authenticity of Spaces in Asia


Spatial Perception and Identity Recognition of New Migrants in China: A Case Study of Xiasha District, Hangzhou City
Yixia Cai, Columbia University; Bo Cui, Zhejiang University of Media and Communications

From Faust to Faux. Some Critical Perspectives on Theming in Urban China
Maria Francesca Piazzoni, University of Southern California; Tridib Banerjee, University of Sourthern California

Private-Public Works in Jakarta and the Developmental Tradeoff
Matt Wade, University of California, Berkeley

Speakers
YC

Yixia Cai

Columbia University
avatar for Maria Francesca Piazzoni, University of Southern California

Maria Francesca Piazzoni, University of Southern California

USC Price School of Public Policy, Urban Planning.
MW

Matt Wade

Department of City and Regional Planning, University of California, Berkeley

Sponsors
Moderators
avatar for Maria Francesca Piazzoni, University of Southern California

Maria Francesca Piazzoni, University of Southern California

USC Price School of Public Policy, Urban Planning.

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Indigo 202B

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.03 Influences and Outcomes of Socially and Spatially Segregated Cities in South and Central America
Moderator: Lucia Capanema-Alvares, Universidade Federal Fluminense; Session Coordinator:Lucia Alvarez, UNAM-Mexico

Creativity and Protests: Cultural and Social Movements as Responses to Repression in Grassroots Communities in Rio de Janeiro
Lucia Capanema-Alvares, Universidade Federal Fluminense; Jorge Luiz Barbosa, Universidade Federal Fluminense

Social Control and Justice in the Favelas of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: An Appraisal of the Pacification and Slum Upgrading Programs (2008-2015)
Rachel Coutinho-Silva, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

New Patterns of Social Integration and Cohesion in Diverse Zones of Segregated Origin (DZSO)
Graciela Fernández de Córdova, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú

Education, Migration and Labor in Heterogeneous Cities – A Gender View
Janina Leon, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru

Speakers
LC

Lucia Capanema-Alvares

Professor, Universidade Federal Fluminense
GF

Graciela Fernández de Córdova

Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú
RC

Rachel Coutinho-Silva, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro

Associate Professor, Graduate Program in Urbanism, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
avatar for Janina Leon

Janina Leon

Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Dept. Economics

Moderators
LA

Lucia Alvarez

UNAM-Mexico
LC

Lucia Capanema-Alvares

Professor, Universidade Federal Fluminense

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Indigo 204A

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.04 Place-Making and Identity at the U.S.-Mexico Border


Latino Vendor Markets as Placemaking Sites: Case Studies of Texas and California
Edna Ledesma, Texas A&M University

Input-Output Based Cluster Method to Identify Traded Industry Clusters in the CaliBaja Region
Sanchita Mukherjee, San Diego Association of Governments; Alejandro Brugués, Colegio de la Frontera Norte; Daniel Flyte, San Diego Association of Governments; Melissa Floca, University of California, San Diego; David Shirk, University of San Diego; Michael Combs, San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation

Theorizing Community Organizing in a Diverse Society: Case Study in Rio Grande Valley Colonias
Danielle Z Rivera, University of Michigan

The Transborder Identity Formation Process: A Grounded Theory Study
Vanessa Falcon, San Diego State University

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Falcon

Vanessa Falcon

San Diego State University
BIOGRAPHY: Vannessa Falcon is from the San Diego, California and Tijuana, Mexico border region. She was born in Los Angeles, California and lived most her life between the countries of the United States and Mexico by crossing the international border everyday. As a member of the... Read More →
avatar for Edna Ledesma

Edna Ledesma

Texas A&M University
SM

Sanchita Mukherjee

Economic Research Analyst, San Diego Association of Governments
avatar for Danielle Z Rivera

Danielle Z Rivera

Doctoral Candidate in Urban Planning, University of Michigan
I am a doctoral candidate in urban planning at the University of Michigan. My research examines theories and histories of insurgent planning. Currently, I am exploring these topics through a comparative case analysis of community organizations in Rio Grande Valley colonias in South... Read More →

Sponsors
Moderators
avatar for Edna Ledesma

Edna Ledesma

Texas A&M University

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua Salon F

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.06 The Role of Policy in Neighborhood Change


The Role of Public Policy in Nashville's Gentrifying Neighborhoods
Ken Chilton, Tennessee State University; Cara Robinson, Tennessee State University; Michael Harris, Tennessee State University

Gentrification and Tax Abatements: A Case Study From Philadelphia, PA
Spencer Clayton, Rutgers University - Camden

 “Eyes on the Street”: Surveillance and Urban Revitalization in Toronto
Vanessa Rosa, Mount Holyoke College



Speakers
avatar for Spencer T.  Clayton

Spencer T. Clayton

Rutgers University - Camden
avatar for Vanessa Rosa

Vanessa Rosa

Assistant Professor of Latina/o Studies, Mount Holyoke College

Moderators

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Indigo 206

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.07 Neighborhood Revitalization: Decision-Making and Displacement


Changing Communities? The Impact of University Interventions in Neighborhood Revitalization
Meagan Ehlenz, Arizona State University

Tapping the New Gold Mines: Extractive Urbanism and Neighborhood Change in the Panhandle Plains
Nathan S. Foote, University of Texas at San Antonio

Revitalizing Los Angeles Chinatown: Redefining the Boundaries of Community & Neighborhood
Laureen Hom, University of California, Irvine

Retrofitting Postwar Suburbs. Overcoming Social and Planning Barriers in the Montreal Metropolitan Area
Claire Poitras, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique - Urbanisation Culture Société; Samuel Descoteaux-Fréchette, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique - Urbanisation Culture Société; Claire Poitras, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique - Urbanisation Culture Société

Speakers
ME

Meagan Ehlenz

Arizona State University
avatar for Nathan S. Foote

Nathan S. Foote

Doctoral Student, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
CP

Claire Poitras

Institut national de la recherche scientifique - Urbanisation Culture Société

Moderators
ME

Meagan Ehlenz

Arizona State University

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Indigo Ballroom B

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.08 Communities and Police: What Really Matters in Creating Viable Relationships


Community Policing & the Welfare State: The Problem of Institutional Selectivity
Barry Goetz, Western Michigan University

What Urbanists Should Know About (Community) Policing?
Matthew Thomas, California State University, Chico; Peter Burns, Soka University of America

Street Level Bureaucrats Under the Microscope: Body Cameras Impact on Citizens Perceptions of Body Cameras
James Wright II, American University

Speakers
BG

Barry Goetz

Western Michigan University
JW

James Wright II

American University
MT

Matthew Thomas

Professor, California State University, Chico

Moderators
MT

Matthew Thomas

Professor, California State University, Chico

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua Salon E

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.09 Gender Identity and the City



The Discriminatory Geographies of ‘America’s Hidden Rape Crisis’: A Rapid Assessment Model and Case Study of Police Malfeasance
Alec Brownlow, DePaul University

The Study of Immigrant Entrepreneurs in Montreal: The Necessity of Employing GBA
Sylvie Paré, University of Quebec in Montreal

The Gender Values-Vulnerability Nexus and Studying Societal Responses to Terrorism
Kevin Keenan, College of Charleston

Speakers
avatar for Alec Brownlow

Alec Brownlow

DePaul University
avatar for Sylvie Paré

Sylvie Paré

Professeure titulaire, University of Quebec in Montreal
Je m'intéresse aux questions de genre, d'ethnicité et de classes sociales dans la ville, à Montréal ou à Toronto. Pour le moment, mes travaux portent essentiellement sur les femmes immigrantes entrepreneures de Montréal, le genre et territoire et la transition du quartier de... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Sylvie Paré

Sylvie Paré

Professeure titulaire, University of Quebec in Montreal
Je m'intéresse aux questions de genre, d'ethnicité et de classes sociales dans la ville, à Montréal ou à Toronto. Pour le moment, mes travaux portent essentiellement sur les femmes immigrantes entrepreneures de Montréal, le genre et territoire et la transition du quartier de... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua 314

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.10 Poverty, Vulnerability and Urban Form


The Presence of Non-Parent Adults and Economic Realities for Children in Low-income Neighborhoods
Kate Bachtell, NORC at the University of Chicago; Nola du Toit, University of Chicago; Catherine Haggerty, University of Chicago

Food Insecurity and the Risk of Housing Instability in Urban Families
Christian King, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

City Variation and The Economic Dimensions of Urbanism
Alexis Mann, Brandeis University



Speakers
KB

Kate Bachtell

NORC at the University of Chicago
CK

Christian King

University of Nebraska - Lincoln
AM

Alexis Mann

Brandeis University

Moderators
CK

Christian King

University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua 313

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.12 Access to Food in Urban Residential Areas: Policy and Politics


If You Build it, Will They Come, and What Will They Eat? Points of Friction Between Community Development and Behavior Change in Food Deserts
Benjamin Chrisinger, Stanford University

The Dynamics Between the Food Environment and Residential Segregation
Ferzana Havewala, University of Texas at Dallas

California Farmers’ Market Food Assistance Program Suitability Analysis
Steven Scott, University of California - Irvine; Harya Dillion, University of California - Irvine; Sally Geislar, University of California - Irvine

Utilizing Spatial Analysis to Measure Socioeconomic Change Around New Supermarkets in Urban Food Deserts
Danny Tarng, Rutgers University, Camden; Sarah Cordivano, Azavea

Food Trucks in Chicago and Durham, NC: How Policy Reflects and Shapes Equity Among Street Vendors
Nina Martin, University of North Carolina at Chaple Hill




Speakers
avatar for Benjamin Chrisinger

Benjamin Chrisinger

Stanford University
avatar for Ferzana Havewala

Ferzana Havewala

University of Texas at Dallas
NM

Nina Martin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of North Carolina at Chaple Hill
SS

Steven Scott

University of California - Irvine
DT

Danny Tarng

Rutgers University, Camden

Moderators
NM

Nina Martin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of North Carolina at Chaple Hill

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua Salon C

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.14 Interrogating ‘The Everyday’ in Urbanism, Planning and Design Discourse and Practice
We interrogate different aspects of ‘the everyday’ as it has become a ubiquities term in urban theory, planning, and design discourses and practice. While on the surface it may seem like a fairly innocuous term of inclusion, incorporating the masses, and broadening the reach and equity of urban intellectual conversations and actual practice, this panel takes a critical look at its origins, drills down to the dark side of it as a phenomenon, and its privileging of day over night. The philosophical/phenomenological origins of the term have in some instances pejoratively framed the everyday while later scholars begin to praise the everyday as a note worthy and practical phenomenon that celebrates the working class and the banality of their life. As the term was picked up by planning and design scholarship it has become a touchstone for equity planning and community based approaches to development that also celebrated the power and importance of working class and poor people without challenging the structural context that positions people as working class and poor. The exclusive focus on the everyday also ignores the everynight, which is a significant hole in our understanding of cities and communities. Through our critical examination of the everyday we hope to provide a platform from which a reformulation and understanding of the concept would lead to the transformative power of the everyday. How might we develop new ways of using the everyday that reimagine relationships of individuals and structures to make cities and communities better? How can we better adapt the concept as it travels from other disciplines to planning and urban discourse and design? What are the limits and or opportunities of the everyday as a concept in planning as it relates to violence against women? This panel respond to these questions with theoretical and practical reflections.

The “Everyday” as a Travelling Concept in Urban Planning and design Discourse: Toward Usability
Timothy O. Imeokparia, University of Illinois Chicago Great Cities Institute

The Dark Side of the Everyday
Matthew Wilson, University of Illinois Chicago Great Cities Institute

Everyday and Everynight Life
Sara Ortiz Escalante, University of British Columbia

Intersectional Understandings of Everyday Violence Against Mexican Women
Elizabeth L. Sweet, Temple University

Speakers
MW

Matthew Wilson, University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois at Chicago
TI

Timothy Imeokparia, University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois Chicago Great Cities Institute
SO

Sara Ortiz Escalante

University of British Columbia
avatar for Elizabeth Sweet

Elizabeth Sweet

Geography and Urban Studies, Temple University

Moderators
TI

Timothy Imeokparia, University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois Chicago Great Cities Institute

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua Salon A/B

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.15 Confronting the Theory-Practice Divide


Improving the Exchange Between Theory and Practice in Local Government Management: An Examination of Perspectives
Robert Blair, University of Nebraska at Omaha; Christian Janousek, University of Nebraska Omaha

Can Planners Be Part of the Solution or are They Part of the Problem? Economic and Social Justice and Practice Imperatives
Kirk Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

A Group Portrait of Corrupt Officials in U.S. City Governments
Yahong Zhang, Rutgers University in Newark

Speakers
avatar for Robert Blair

Robert Blair

Associate Professor of Public Administration and Urban Studies, University of Nebraska at Omaha
I am passionate about professional local government management and the potential of its application to other countries, respecting their traditions, history, and political culture. I am also less passionate about the Chicago Cubs
avatar for Kirk E. Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Kirk E. Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Dr. Kirk E.  Harris is the first full-time tenured African-American faculty member in the Department of Urban Planning, in the School of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. Dr. Harris' academic interests are focused on racial and economic... Read More →
YZ

Yahong Zhang

Rutgers University in Newark

Moderators
avatar for Kirk E. Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Kirk E. Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Dr. Kirk E.  Harris is the first full-time tenured African-American faculty member in the Department of Urban Planning, in the School of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. Dr. Harris' academic interests are focused on racial and economic... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua 310B

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.16 Response to Emergencies and Disasters! What Explains the Difference?


Crude Responses: A Comparative Analysis of the 2015 Santa Barbara Oil Spill and 2010 Gulf Oil Spill and Implications for Coastal Cities
Robert Collins, Dillard University

Behavioral and Contextual Factors Affecting Fire Department Response Times: Implications for Urban Managers and Planners
Daniel Scheller, University of Texas at El Paso; Dennis Reglen, University of Texas at El Paso

An Analysis of the Economic and Institutional Factors Affecting Recovery by State and Local Governments from Hurricanes
Jesseca Short, University of North Texas

Speakers
DS

Daniel Scheller, University of Texas at El Paso

Assistant Professor, University of Texas at El Paso
JS

Jesseca Short

University of North Texas
avatar for Robert Collins, Dillard University

Robert Collins, Dillard University

Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy, Dillard University
Robert Collins is Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy at Dillard University in New Orleans. Other positions he has held at Dillard include: Associate Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Founding Dean of the College of Arts and... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Robert Collins, Dillard University

Robert Collins, Dillard University

Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy, Dillard University
Robert Collins is Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy at Dillard University in New Orleans. Other positions he has held at Dillard include: Associate Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Founding Dean of the College of Arts and... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua 309

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.17 Analysing the Local Electoral Context of Our Times


The Politics of Potholes: Service Quality and Retrospective Voting in Local Elections
Vladimir Kogan, Ohio State University; Craig Burnett, UNC at Wilmington

Does a Municipal Electoral Campaign Remain a Relevant Place to Politicize Citizens? The Example of the Municipal Election of 2013 in Montreal
Caroline Patsias, Université du Québec in Montreal; Sylvie Patsias, Sciences-po Aix

“Engaging State Power”: Lessons From Chokwe Lumumba’s Mayoral Tenure in Jackson, Mississippi
Sage Ponder, University of British Columbia

Selecting Police Chief in the Postindustrial Economy
Adam Uddin, Wayne State University

Speakers
CP

Caroline Patsias

Université du Québec in Montreal
SP

Sage Ponder

University of British Columbia
AU

Adam Uddin

Wayne State University

Moderators

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua 307

10:30am PDT

FR10.30.18 Actioning the Progressive City
There is a serious gap between the problems faced by 21st century cities and their proposed solutions, which are often ad hoc, incremental, siloed, and symbolic. Critics have well documented the inadequacy of current urban policies. However, they have offered few specific alternatives to realize a progressive agenda. How can progressive movements in cities be encouraged and supported to become full-fledged political alternatives? What types of policies, administrations, and governance systems are required to anchor a progressive city? For this panel, we welcome both conceptual and case-focused papers that examine how to action the progressive city with the view to create a research network that can translate progressive theory to practice.

Winning at City Hall: Community Labor Partnerships in the Neoliberal City
Jacob Lesniewski, Dominican University

Distribution as Development: Rethinking the Politics of Urban Equity
Greg Schrock, Portland State University

Progressive Options for Detroit Under Conditions of Austerity
Louise Jezierski, Michigan State University

Inclusive Urban Development: The Role of Community Organizations Advocating for Housing Across the US and Brazil
Maureen Donaghy, Rutgers University, Camden

A Policy Agenda for the Progressive City
Ronald Vogel, Ryerson University

Speakers
avatar for Jacob Lesniewski

Jacob Lesniewski

Assistant Professor, Dominican University
I teach social policy to social workers. I think a lot about how low-wage workers (and low-wage immigrant workers especially) can improve their working conditions. I spend a lot of time working with worker centers in Chicago. I'm starting to think about privatization and its effects... Read More →
avatar for Greg Schrock

Greg Schrock

Portland State University
avatar for Louise Jezierski, Michigan State University

Louise Jezierski, Michigan State University

Michigan State University
I have been a professor at Michigan State since 1997.My MA and PhD are in Sociology from UC Berkeley, and my BA is from Boston University in Sociology and Geography.
avatar for Ronald Vogel, Ryerson University

Ronald Vogel, Ryerson University

Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University
My research interests focus on metropolitan governance, global cities, and comparative urban politics.

Moderators
avatar for Ronald Vogel, Ryerson University

Ronald Vogel, Ryerson University

Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University
My research interests focus on metropolitan governance, global cities, and comparative urban politics.

Friday March 18, 2016 10:30am - 11:55am PDT
Aqua Salon D

12:00pm PDT

1:44pm PDT

Friday - Concurrent Sessions
Friday March 18, 2016 1:44pm - 3:10pm PDT
See session listing
  Panels

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.05 Authors Meet Critics: Chaskin and Joseph's Integrating the Inner City
Three leading urban scholars from a mix of disciplines will provide their reflections on the 2015 book Integrating the Inner City: The Promise and Perils of Mixed-Income Public Housing Transformation by Robert Chaskin and Mark Joseph. Book description: For many years Chicago’s looming large-scale housing projects defined the city, and their demolition and redevelopment—via the Chicago Housing Authority’s Plan for Transformation—has been perhaps the most startling change in the city’s urban landscape in the last twenty years. The Plan, which reflects a broader policy effort to remake public housing in cities across the country, seeks to deconcentrate poverty by transforming high-poverty public housing complexes into mixed-income developments and thereby integrating once-isolated public housing residents into the social and economic fabric of the city. But is the Plan an ambitious example of urban regeneration or a not-so-veiled effort at gentrification? In the most thorough examination of mixed-income public housing redevelopment to date, Chaskin and Joseph draw on five years of field research, in-depth interviews, and volumes of data to demonstrate that while considerable progress has been made in transforming the complexes physically, the integrationist goals of the policy have not been met. They provide a highly textured investigation into what it takes to design, finance, build, and populate a mixed-income development, and they illuminate the many challenges and limitations of the policy as a solution to urban poverty. Chaskin and Joseph’s findings raise concerns about the increased privatization of housing for the poor while providing a wide range of recommendations for a better way forward.

Speakers
RB

Raphael Bostic

University of Southern California
LM

Lynne Manzo

University of Washington
SS

Susan Saegert

City University of New York

Moderators

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Indigo 204B

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.12 The Intersection of Education and Social Justice: Mapping the Research and Advocacy Fields (ACTIVIST SCHOLARSHIP SESSION)
Over the past twenty years, neoliberal school reforms have gained increasing momentum across the United States, emphasizing school choice, market discipline, standardized testing, high-stakes evaluation, privatized management, and the reframing of public education as a site for capital investment. These reforms intersect with cities and communities in complex ways. Critics argue that neoliberal reforms exacerbate educational inequalities and can have dramatically differential consequences for low-income and wealthier communities. Understanding the intersections between these reform strategies and questions of social justice, community development, and urban policy requires interdisciplinary engagement that bridges the confines of traditional academic disciplines. Increasingly, scholars of psychology, education, politics, sociology, urban studies, economics, and planning, among others, are examining the broader impacts of these neoliberal reforms, particularly on our most vulnerable communities. UAA, which brings together interdisciplinary scholars interested in issues of social justice and urban policy, is the perfect venue for that conversation to take place. This colloquy will enable UAA participants to map the research questions at the intersection of neoliberal school reforms, social and economic justice, community development and urban policy and to explore how that research can be connected to policy advocacy and local activism. Participants will discuss their research and/or research that they are familiar with; collectively frame the research questions that emerge; explore the different methodologies employed; and begin to connect the dots across research areas. We will then explore how this research can be connected to policy advocacy and local activism work. The overall goals are to increase the knowledge base within the UAA of who is doing education related work, create networks among these researchers, and, hopefully, seed collaborative projects. This colloquy is designed for UAA participants who are doing, or thinking about doing, research on the issues above or any educational issues that intersect with social justice considerations.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Ferman

Barbara Ferman

Professor, Temple University
Born and raised in Brooklyn (which is still the 4th largest city!), I had an early education about urban areas that was shaped by some very practical activities – turning empty lots into playgrounds, keeping the hand ball court for hours, dodging traffic, and learning the subway... Read More →
avatar for Ryan M. Good

Ryan M. Good

Part-Time Lecturer, Rutgers University
I hold a Ph.D. in Planning and Public Policy from the Bloustein School at Rutgers University. My interests lie in the areas of community development, place-based organizations, and the politics of neighborhood identity. In my dissertation, I studied how local stakeholders invoked... Read More →
avatar for Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers

Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers

Associate Professor, Rutgers
Julia Sass Rubin, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University and an Associate Visiting Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. She also is one of the founding members of Save Our Schools... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers

Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers

Associate Professor, Rutgers
Julia Sass Rubin, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University and an Associate Visiting Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. She also is one of the founding members of Save Our Schools... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua Salon E

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.20 Getting Tenure/Promotion —Research/Publication Strategies (COLLOQUY ORGANIZED BY UAA VICE CHAIR)
Conducting research and disseminating results from it are core scholarly activities. To increase their chances of obtaining tenure, new faculty are often encouraged to publish early and often. This colloquy was organized so junior faculty can benefit from the insights of senior scholars about how to develop a research program and navigate the publication process. The colloquy will cover strategies for developing a high quality research program that results in publications. Topics to be discussed include: the scope of publication outlets (journals, books, etc.), the peer review process, the selection of journals to submit manuscripts to, how single-authored and co-authored publications are weighed, and the roles of funded and unfunded research in the early stages of academic careers.

Speakers
avatar for Maria Martinez-Cosio

Maria Martinez-Cosio

Asst. Vice Provost Faculty Affairs, University of Texas - Arlington
I am interested in faculty development and student success. I am the PI of a $2.6M Department of Education Title V grant aimed at improving the success of transfer students, specifically those from underserved populations. My research is on private foundations engaged in comprehensive... Read More →
TS

Todd Swanstrom

Professor in Community Collaboration and Public Po, University of Missouri-St. Louis
AM

Anna Maria Santiago, Michigan State University

Professor of Social Work, Michigan State University

Moderators
avatar for Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Professor, University at Buffalo
Rob Silverman's research focuses on the non-profit sector, the role of community-based organizations in urban neighborhoods, education reform, and inequality in inner city housing markets. His current research projects include studies of non-profit finance and advocacy,school reform,shrinking... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua 311B

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.01 Urban Environment and Sustainable Development in Asia


Back to the Countryside! Reconfiguring Rural-Urban Typologies, Recovering China's Agricultural and Ecological Landscapes
Shannon Bassett, University at Buffalo, State University of New York

Urban Spatial Form and Household Carbon Emissions: A Study of Fourteen Neighborhoods in Beijing
Bo Qin, Renmin University of China

The Northern Environmental Education Regional Center of Taiwan: Interventions in Human Niche Construction
Huei-Min Tsai, National Taiwan Normal University; Eric Clark, Lund University

Factor Endowment, Environmental Regulation and the Dynamics of Pollution-Intensive Industries in China
Yi Zhou, Peking University; Canfei He, Peking University

Speakers
avatar for Shannon Bassett

Shannon Bassett

Assistant Professor of Architecture and Urban Design, University at Buffalo, State University of New York
avatar for Huei-Min Tsai

Huei-Min Tsai

Associate Professor, National Taiwan Normal University
YZ

Yi Zhou

Peking University

Sponsors
Moderators
avatar for Shannon Bassett

Shannon Bassett

Assistant Professor of Architecture and Urban Design, University at Buffalo, State University of New York

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Indigo 202A

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.02 Better Coordinating Urban and Rural Development in China



The Characters Comparisons Between Extended Boundary in Different Development Phases of Small and Medium Cities in Northwest China
Xiaojian Chen, Xi'an University of Architecture and Technology; Yiwen Tan, Xi'an University of Architecture and Technology

Coordinated Urban and Rural Development Models in China’s Developed Areas: A Revisit of 16 Mega-City Regions
Chen Chen, Tongji University, Chenghao Fang, Tongji University, Min Zhao, Tongji University

China’s New Suburban Reality: An Attempt to Systematically Define the Chinese Suburb
Pengfei Li, The Graduate Center, City University of New York and New York City College of Technology

Urban Regeneration in Peri-Urban Area of Megacities in China
Yumin YE, Renmin University of China

Speakers
CC

Chen Chen

Assistant Professor, Tongji University
Chen Chen is Assistant Professor at College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Tongji University. He specializes in urbanization, urban and regional development, urban economics, and quantitative spatial analytics. Chen Chen got his Bachelor, Master and Ph.D. from Tongji University... Read More →
XC

Xiaojian Chen

Xi'an University of Architecture and Technology
avatar for Pengfei Li

Pengfei Li

PHD Candidate and Lecturer, The Graduate Center, City University of New York and New York City College of Technology
Pengfei holds a M.Phil and wraps up his PHD in Environmental Psychology from the City University of New York. He has been teaching psychology at New York City College of Technology since 2011. From June 2014 to August 2015, Pengfei conducted his field work in Beijing and taught classes... Read More →
YY

Yumin Ye

Renmin University of China

Sponsors
Moderators
JW

Jing Wang

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Indigo 202B

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.03 Regional Governance and Policy Innovation in China's Urban Development



The Dynamics of Administrative Hierarchical Reform and Coordinated Regional Development in the Course of China’s Urbanization
Tao Sun, Nankai University

A Longitudinal Study into Innovation Diffusion Mechanism Among Chinese Cities
Jiannan Wu, Shanghai Jiaotong University; Pan Zhang, Xi'an Jiaotong University

Booming Provincial-Led North-South City-To-City Cooperation in China: A Case Study of Suzhou-Suqian Industrial Park of Jiangsu Province
Shi Xian, City University of Hong Kong; Roger C.K. Chan, The University of Hong Kong; Zhixin Qi, Sun Yat-Sen University

Does the Land Financing Inhibit Regional Innovation? Preliminary Empirical Evidence from China
Bo Yan, Harvard Kennedy School/ Xi'an Jiaotong University; Jiannan Wu, Shanghai Jiaotong University

Mega Cities, Urban Hierarchy and Fiscal Decentralization: Evidence from Chinese Regions
Lin Ye, Sun Yat-sen University; Yingling Gao, Sun Yat-sen University

Speakers
LY

Lin Ye, Sun Yat-sen University

Sun Yat-Sen University
JW

Jiannan Wu

Shanghai Jiaotong University
SX

Shi Xian

City University of Hong Kong
BY

Bo Yan

Harvard Kennedy School/ Xi'an Jiaotong University

Moderators
LY

Lin Ye, Sun Yat-sen University

Sun Yat-Sen University

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Indigo 204A

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.04 Planning and Environmental Challenges on the Border


A Cross National Investigation of Flood Risk Perceptions and Hazard Preparedness in Two Urban Communities
Victoria Basolo, University of California, Irvine; Kristen Goodrich, University of California, Irvine; Santina Contreras, University of California, Irvine; Richard Matthew, University of California, Irvine; Brett Sanders, University of California, Irvine; David Feldman, University of California, Irvine

International Border Crossing Strategies: Planning and Implementation Issues
Arturo José de las Fuentes Hernández, Cruces y Puentes Internacionales S.A. de C.V.

Urban Erosion: Attitudes and Knowledge About Environmental Hazards in Tijuana, Mexico
Kristen Goodrich, University of California, Irvine; Ana Eguiarte, Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve; Victoria Basolo, University of California, Irvine; Richard Matthew, University of California, Irvine; Brett Sanders, University of California, Irvine; Santina Contreras, University of California, Irvine

Finding Variation in Local Sustainability Efforts Among the US-Mexico Border Cities
Sung-Wook Kwon, Texas Tech University; Sylvia Gonzalez-Gorman, Indiana State University; Dennis Patterson, Texas Tech University

Speakers
KG

Kristen Goodrich

University of California, Irvine
avatar for Arturo José de las Fuentes Hernández

Arturo José de las Fuentes Hernández

President, Cruces y Puentes Internacionales S.A. de C.V.
SK

Sung-Wook Kwon

Associate Professor, Texas Tech University

Sponsors
Moderators

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua Salon F

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.06 Social and Cultural Consequences of Gentrification


Segregated Spaces of Gentrifying Skid Rows: A Comparison of Los Angeles' Skid Row, Miami's Overtown, Tokyo's San'ya, and Osaka's Kamagasaki
Matthew Marr, Florida International University

There’s Nothing Here for Me: The Real Effects of Gentrification for Neighborhood Residents
Sara Martucci, City University of New York, Graduate Center

Negotiating Diversification: Are They Invaders or Improvers? - New Residents in an Old Neighborhood - A Case in Baltimore City, Maryland
Naka Matsumoto, University of Maryland, College Park

Local Residents’ Perceptions of Urban Diversity in Gentrifying Neighborhoods
Ingmar Pastak, University of Tartu; Kadri Leetmaa, University of Tartu; Johanna Holvandus, University of Tartu

Korean BBQ and Pabst Blue Ribbon: Gentrification and Consuming "The Other"
Aaron Niznik, Brown University

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Marr

Matthew Marr

Associate Professor, Florida International University
Matthew Marr
avatar for Sara Martucci

Sara Martucci

Assistant Professor, Mercy College
gentrification, retail, housing, cultural displacement, neighborhoods
avatar for Naka Matsumoto

Naka Matsumoto

PhD Candidate, University of Maryland, College Park
AN

Aaron Niznik

Brown University
IP

Ingmar Pastak

University of Tartu

Moderators
avatar for Matthew Marr

Matthew Marr

Associate Professor, Florida International University
Matthew Marr

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Indigo 206

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.07 Economic and Social Impacts of the Built Environment



Do Plans Still Matter?: How TOD Plans Affect Businesses in St. Louis, MO’s Light Rail Station Areas
Dwayne Baker, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Overcoming Spatial Mismatch: The Influence of Transit Mode and Transit Quality on Black Male Employment
Kenya Covington, California State University Northridge

Neighborhood Characteristics and Resiliency to the Impacts of Housing Abandonment
Hye-Sung Han, University of Missouri-Kansas City



Speakers
DB

Dwayne Baker

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
HH

Hye-Sung Han, University of Missouri-Kansas City

University of Missouri-Kansas City
KC

Kenya Covington

California State University Northridge

Moderators
KC

Kenya Covington

California State University Northridge

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua Salon A/B

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.08 Challenges to Social Sustainability in Urban Communities


City Revival – Between Urban Planning and Insurgent Grassroots Urbanism
Anna Domaradzka, University of Warsaw

Social Cohesion in the Urban Space of Kampung Kauman in Semarang, Indonesia
Hye Yeoun Ji, Seoul National University; Sea Eun Cho, Seoul National University; Heechul Kim, Seoul National University

The Right to the Camp? Exceptionalism, Urbanization and the Protracted Exile
Dorota Woroniecka-Krzyzanowska, University of Lodz

Speakers
avatar for Anna Domaradzka

Anna Domaradzka

Assistant Professor, Associate Director for Research, University of Warsaw
HY

Hye Yeoun Ji

Seoul National University

Moderators

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua 313

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.09 The Built Environment and Public Safety



Locked out of the Academy: Does Campus Expansion Increase Racial Bias in Policing?
Stephen Sherman, University of Illinois

Urban Security/Safety Policy-Making at the “Borderlands”: A Grounded Comparison Lisbon-Memphis TN
Simone Tulumello, University of Lisbon/University of Memphis

Understanding Activities of Liquor Stores in Two Urban neighborhoods: South Orange and Newark, New Jersey
Christopher A. Watson, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Sherman

Stephen Sherman

PhD candidate, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
PhD candidate in Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.Research focus: policing and urban planning, anchor institutions, economic development, qualitative GISOther interests: higher education in prison, anthropology of policing, the American... Read More →
avatar for Simone Tulumello

Simone Tulumello

University of Lisbon / University of Memphis
avatar for Christopher A. Watson

Christopher A. Watson

PhD Student, College of Architecture and Design, New Jersey Institute of Technology
My research interests coalesce around some of the most enduring themes of urban scholarship: the intersections of poverty, race, and class; and the physical and socio-political impacts and consequences of gentrification in American cities.

Moderators

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua 309

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.11 Race, Poverty and Continuing Urban Inequality


Planned to Fail: Creating the Global South in American South Communities
William Holt, Birmingham-Southern College

The Geography of White Poverty
Sigmund Shipp, Hunter College; Lynn McCofmick, Hunter College; Mary Rocco, University of Pennsylvania

Unpacking the Racial Inequality in Place: Using Youth Perceptions to Inform and Address Racial Inequality in Neighborhood Environments
Samantha Teixeira, Boston College; Anita Zuberi, University of Pittsburgh

Stalled Progress: A Qualitative Examination of High School Students’ Racial Attitudes
Irina Chukhray, Rice University; Jennifer L. Bratter, Rice University

Critical Race Theory Comes Home To Roost: Disparate Treatment and the Management of Residential Segregation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas
Daniel Monti, Saint Louis University

Speakers
avatar for Irina Chukhray

Irina Chukhray

PhD Student, Rice University
RESEARCH AREA: education and race
WH

William Holt

Birmingham-Southern College
SS

Sigmund Shipp

Hunter College

Moderators
WH

William Holt

Birmingham-Southern College

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua 314

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.13 Identifying Barriers to Good Health and Services


The Intersection of Disorder, Stigma, and Place in Urban Emergency Medical Services Work
Christopher Prener, Saint Louis University

Hybrid Health Care: The Use of Social Ties and Intermediary Support by the Urban Poor
Danielle Raudenbush, University of California, San Diego

Policy’s Influence on Health Inequality: The Role of the Earned Income Tax Credit
Megan Hatch, Cleveland State University

Evaluating Spatial and Non-spatial Access as Suitability Components for Better Health
Sulhee Yoon, University of Florida; Ali Komeily, University of Florida; Ilir Bejleri, University of Florida

Speakers
avatar for Megan Hatch

Megan Hatch

Cleveland State University
CP

Christopher Prener

Saint Louis University
avatar for Sulhee (Sunny) Yoon

Sulhee (Sunny) Yoon

Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Urban and Regional Planning at University of Florida
Sulhee (Sunny) is a doctoral candidate at the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at University of Florida. She also pursues her doctoral minor degree in Health Service Research. Her research applies spatial statistics and GIS to integrate built environment and public health... Read More →


Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua 305

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.14 Innovative Approaches to Strengthening Sustainability


Residential Food Waste: Communicating New Norms of Separation
Sally Geislar, University of California, Irvine

Civic Ecology Education as a Strategy for Promoting Urban Sustainability
Bemmy Maharramov, University of California, Irvine

Priority Setting in Sustainable Development: Findings From a National Survey of Community Action Agencies
Nathaniel Wright, Texas Tech University

Speakers
avatar for Bemmy Maharramli

Bemmy Maharramli

Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Irvine
I am a Doctoral Candidate at the University of California, Irvine's Department of Urban Planning and Public Policy. My research focuses on how community partners work together to integrate nature for more resilient and sustainable cities. I research how universities can be empowering... Read More →
avatar for Nathaniel Wright

Nathaniel Wright

Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University
Dr. Nathaniel Wright received his B.A. and Masters of Public Administration from Binghamton University (2005, 2006); and Ph.D. in Public Administration from the University of Kansas (2014). Dr. Wright conducts research on the role that social advocacy nonprofits play in creating sustainable... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Nathaniel Wright

Nathaniel Wright

Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University
Dr. Nathaniel Wright received his B.A. and Masters of Public Administration from Binghamton University (2005, 2006); and Ph.D. in Public Administration from the University of Kansas (2014). Dr. Wright conducts research on the role that social advocacy nonprofits play in creating sustainable... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua 307

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.15 Time to Learn: Reconsidering the Actual Outcomes of Urban Mega Projects



Urban Development and the Olympics – What is an Olympic Legacy?
Greg Andranovich, California State University, Los Angeles; Matthew Burbank, University of Utah

Urban Interests and Public Investment: Looking Back, Thinking Ahead
Heywood Sanders, University of Texas at San Antonio

Mega-Value or Mega-Dud? The Benefits to Cities of Hosting a Political Convention as a Mega-Event
David Swindell, Arizona State University; Suzanne Leland, University of North Carolina Charlotte; Eric Heberlig, University of North Carolina Charlotte

Speakers
avatar for David Swindell

David Swindell

Director, Center for Urban Innovation, Arizona State University
David Swindell is the Director of the Center for Urban Innovation and an associate professor in the School of Public Affairs at Arizona State University. His work focuses primarily on community and economic development, especially public financing of sports facilities, the contribution... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for David Swindell

David Swindell

Director, Center for Urban Innovation, Arizona State University
David Swindell is the Director of the Center for Urban Innovation and an associate professor in the School of Public Affairs at Arizona State University. His work focuses primarily on community and economic development, especially public financing of sports facilities, the contribution... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua Salon C

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.16 Scrutinizing Transport Problematics in Our Days



Impacts of Urban Form on Travel Demand by Bus Transit in the United States: A National Study at Metropolitan Statistical Area Level
Bhuiyan Alam, The University of Toledo; Hilary Nixon, San Jose State University; Qiong Zhang, Michigan State University

US Political Realignment and Partisanship in Urban Transportation Policy
Daniel Bliss, Illinois Institute of Technology

From the Old to the New Politics of Building and Governing Major Transportation Projects in New York and Los Angeles
Steven P. Erie, University of California, San Diego; Scott A. MacKenzie, University of California, Davis; Jameson W. Doig, Dartmouth College

Speakers
avatar for Bhuiyan Alam

Bhuiyan Alam

Associate Professor, The University of Toledo
SE

Steven Erie, University of California San Diego

University of California, San Diego
DB

Daniel Bliss, Illinois Institute of Technology

Illinois Institute of Technology

Moderators
SE

Steven Erie, University of California San Diego

University of California, San Diego

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua 310B

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.17 Gentrification: Reconciling Theory and Realities in Revitalization Practices


The Downside of Upgrading: Financialization, Gentrification, and Displacement in Canada’s Multi-Family Housing Sector
Martine August, Rutgers University

New Housing, Old Urban Fabric: Social Control and Physical Borders of New Housing Development in Old-Montreal District

Priscilla Ananian, University of Quebec in Montreal

Making Rent Gap Theory Not True
Eric Clark, Lund University



Speakers
avatar for Priscilla Ananian

Priscilla Ananian

Professeure, University of Quebec in Montreal
avatar for Martine August

Martine August

Postdoctoral Fellow, Rutgers University
avatar for Eric Clark

Eric Clark

Professor, Lund University

Moderators
avatar for Martine August

Martine August

Postdoctoral Fellow, Rutgers University

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Indigo Ballroom B

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.18 Placemaking: The Dynamics of Arts-Led Development


The Arts as a Catalyst for Neighborhood Development

Dennis Keating, Cleveland State University

Making Attractive Venues of “Public Art” in Shanghai: Toward a New Cultural Strategy for Urban Entrepreneurialism
Zheng Jane (JIe), Chinese University of Hong Kong

The Purposeful Creative City: Social Equity, Cultural Inclusion, and Sustainable Policy
Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller, The Ohio State University



Speakers
avatar for Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller

Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller

Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University
Dr. Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller (PhD, The New School; MBA, SUNY Binghamton; BFA, University of Michigan) specializes in creative economic development, cultural policy, arts entrepreneurship, and nonprofit management. She examines the ways that cities use arts and culture in planning... Read More →
WD

William Dennis Keating

Emeritus Professor, Levin College of Urban Affairs, Cleveland State University
Housing and Community Development
JZ

Jie Zheng

Assistant Professor, Chinese University of Hong Kong

Moderators
avatar for Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller

Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller

Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University
Dr. Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller (PhD, The New School; MBA, SUNY Binghamton; BFA, University of Michigan) specializes in creative economic development, cultural policy, arts entrepreneurship, and nonprofit management. She examines the ways that cities use arts and culture in planning... Read More →

Friday March 18, 2016 1:45pm - 3:10pm PDT
Aqua 311A

1:45pm PDT

FR1.45.19 Innovations in Urban Governance


Municipal Responses To Syrian Refugee Inflow To Lebanon: Studying the Impact of Religio-political Affiliations on Policy Responses
Siba El-Samra, Cornell University

Economic Development and Budget Volatility in Local Governments: Accounting for Industrial Diversification and Clustering
Michael Overton, University of North Texas; Robert Bland, University of North Texas

Directly Elected Mayors: Can They Make a Difference?
Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England; David Sweeting, University of Bristol

Local Networks in Urban Service Delivery Process: The Relationship Between Local Network Management, Network Structure and Outcomes
Itai Beeri, Haifa University; Anna Uster, Haifa University

Speakers
avatar for Itai Beeri

Itai Beeri

Haifa University
Dr. Itai Beeri is a tenure-track lecturer and the Head of the MPA program 'Specialization in Local Government Administration' at the School of Political Science, University of Haifa. Beeri received his Ph.D. from the National University of Ireland-Cork, Faculty of Commerce (2009... Read More →
avatar for Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

Emeritus Professor of City Leadership, University of the West of England, Bristol
I am Emeritus Professor of City Leadership at the University of the West of England, Bristol, UK and Director of Urban Answers, a company I founded in 2007 to provide assistance to city leaders on an international basis. Just now I am working quite closely with Marvin Rees, Mayor... Read More →
SE

Siba El-Samra

Cornell University
MO

Michael Overton

University of North Texas